Regulating Killer Robots On The Battlefield - InformationWeek

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12/30/2013
11:50 AM
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Regulating Killer Robots On The Battlefield

Human rights groups want to ban autonomous weapons.

Human rights groups are calling for a ban on autonomous battlefield robots, raising larger questions about the ethics of robots from the battlefield to eldercare.

Steve Ranger on TechRepublic reports that governments that are part of the Convention on Certain conventional Weapons (CCW) plan to meet in Geneva next year to "discuss the issues related to so-called 'lethal autonomous weapons systems,' or what campaigners have dubbed 'killer robots.'"

I had my eyes opened to the potential for battlefield robots in P.W. Singer's 2009 book Wired for War. He makes a strong case that robots and drones are transforming the nature of warfare in the way that the invention of gunpowder and planes did. War is a fundamental human activity; most nations are fighting a war, building up their defenses, or recovering from a war most of the time. War has broad ramifications for civilian society, from fashion to the Internet itself (fundamental development of which was funded by the US Department of Defense).

Everybody knows about drones, but few people are aware of how deeply fundamental the technology is to America's wars. That was true in 2009, and I expect it's even more true today.

Read the rest of this story on Internet Evolution.

 

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Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
1/2/2014 | 7:55:52 AM
Re: Fundamental wars?
We got rocket technology at least. While wars are abhorrent, they've proven great incentives for developing new technologies. 
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
1/2/2014 | 2:22:53 PM
Re: Fundamental wars?
Woopty, 

Great incentive for devolping better weapons and rockets to kill? Or is there some useful technology inspired by wars?

-Susan 
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
1/2/2014 | 3:59:28 PM
Re: Fundamental wars?
The classical answer is IC technology. Integrated circuits were developed at first to guide ICBMs to their targets. Because of this better targeting capability, most operational missiles now employ nuclear bombs of much smaller yield (kilotons rather than megatons) than would be needed otherwise to destroy specific targets. Without this big early push from the military, the whole field of tech that this website is devoted to could never have happened. For better or worse, war and technological development go hand-in-hand.
stevew928
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stevew928,
User Rank: Ninja
1/9/2014 | 2:02:32 AM
Re: Fundamental wars?
Fundamental due to human nature. I'm not sure why you'd think that by 2014, wars would only be in history books. The last couple centuries have been the bloodiest, and I'd guess we (unfortinately) ain't seen nothing yet.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
1/9/2014 | 7:43:18 AM
Re: Fundamental wars?
Gary, 
"For better or worse, war and technological development go hand-in-hand."
 
Does it mean that there is no chance for peace? Does it mean that after this planet is left close to destruction people will continue developing technology for starting star wars? Why do you think humanity agree to this?
 
-Susan
 
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
1/9/2014 | 11:32:00 PM
Re: Fundamental wars?
Steve, 

"Fundamental due to human nature."

Is human nature fundamentally irrational? 

"I'm not sure why you'd think that by 2014, wars would only be in history books."

Maybe because I am an optimist and believe that at some point humanity would get smarter. Maybe because I believe there are other ways of dealing with conflict, and even it could be possible to avoid conflict. 

"The last couple centuries have been the bloodiest, and I'd guess we (unfortinately) ain't seen nothing yet."

Do you think that speaks of human advancement? 

-Susan 
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