Enterprise 2.0: Is Enterprise Software Failing? - InformationWeek

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11/3/2009
03:52 PM
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Enterprise 2.0: Is Enterprise Software Failing?

Software providers must look beyond lists of features and address business needs. And they must deliver on the promise of the next-generation customer experience.

Finn's recitation of his desirable social and collaborative features addressed enterprise technology requirements but failed to cover any of the business integration issues raised when companies bring collaborative technology into the workplace.

"With so many new technologies, people begin with what can the technology do and only later come back to what the business outcome is that I'm trying to achieve," said Yarmis, who says the Enterprise 2.0 technology market is in desperate need of consolidation.

In a separate conference presentation, Andrew McAfee, principal research scientist for the Center for Digital Business at MIT Sloan School of Management, said there was positive momentum in bringing Enterprise 2.0 technology into organizations, but warned, "We have the opportunity right now to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory."

McAfee urged those implementing Enterprise 2.0 systems to avoid mistakes like declaring war on legacy systems, trying to replace e-mail, and allowing walled gardens to dam the flow of organizational content and expertise.

To prove that institutional obstacles can be overcome, McAfee cited the U.S. intelligence community, which includes more than a dozen federal agencies with a tradition of sprawling, siloed bureaucracies. The intelligence community used to share information on a need-to-know basis, he said. And since 9-11, that has been changing.

McAfee said he asked an internal advocate for collaboration in one of the agencies how the obstacles to sharing had been overcome. He said that he was told, "Our philosophy used to be if we share information too much, people will die. What we learned on 9-11 is if we don't share information enough, people will die."

For most businesses, the effective use of social and collaborative technology may not be a matter of survival, but increasingly it appears to be linked to functioning successfully in the knowledge economy.



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