Treaty Talks On Broadcast Intellectual Property Rights Crumble - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Software // Enterprise Applications
News
6/22/2007
10:47 AM
50%
50%

Treaty Talks On Broadcast Intellectual Property Rights Crumble

U.S. representatives indicated Thursday that they aren't likely to continue discussions on a draft after making little progress in gaining consensus thus far.

The World Intellectual Property Organization broadcast treaty talks are on the verge of collapse.

U.S. representatives indicated Thursday that they aren't likely to continue discussions on a draft after making little progress in gaining consensus thus far. There were several disagreements over a draft document stemming from negotiations that began nearly 10 years ago and would have increased broadcasters' rights to protect their transmissions and thwart signal theft.

Technology and attitudes have changed and participating countries could not agree on basic definitions and goals of the treaty, let alone how to balance the interests of copyright owners against the interests of those who broadcast the material.

Public Knowledge, an advocacy and educational organization focused on intellectual property law and technology policy, issued a statement saying that the collapse is good news for consumers and innovators.

"Broadcasters are seeking a new intellectual property-like right on material they do not own, but which they only broadcast," Gigi B. Sohn, president of Public Knowledge, said in a prepared statement. "Such a right would only hurt consumers who want to transmit TV shows from a set-top box to different TV sets around their house."

Sohn praised the U.S. delegation to WIPO, non-governmental organizations, and technology companies for their diligence and said that new broadcast rights would hurt companies like Sling Media, which offers a device that allows consumers to control their TV content.

"We are well aware that the broadcasters have been trying for this treaty for nine years, and that they won't give up," Sohn said. "They should. Broadcasters have every right to prevent signal theft, but the proposed treaty and the new rights they seek are not necessary."

The Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights is expected to meet Friday and decide whether or not to pave the way for future discussions.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
News
Top 10 Data and Analytics Trends for 2021
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  11/13/2020
Commentary
Where Cloud Spending Might Grow in 2021 and Post-Pandemic
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  11/19/2020
Slideshows
The Ever-Expanding List of C-Level Technology Positions
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  11/10/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Why Chatbots Are So Popular Right Now
In this IT Trend Report, you will learn more about why chatbots are gaining traction within businesses, particularly while a pandemic is impacting the world.
Slideshows
Flash Poll