The Internet's Cool, But TV Remains Ad King - InformationWeek

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The Internet's Cool, But TV Remains Ad King

A Deloitte survey also finds that nearly six in 10 U.S. consumers would like to easily integrate their televisions with their computers to download or watch online content.

The Internet is growing in importance in advertising, but old-fashioned television remains the most influential medium, a study shows.

In a wide-ranging survey of more than 2,000 Americans from ages 14 to 75, consulting firm Deloitte found that TV is still king in the ad world, followed by magazines and the Internet, which tied for second.

Among those people who look at magazines, six in 10 pay greater attention to ads in the publications than on the Web. Among newspaper readers, more than half say the same for newspaper ads. The survey also found that willingness to pay for ad-free content declined 9 points from the same survey last year, but a quarter of respondents still said they were ready to pay to not see advertising.

Digital video recorders continued to play an important role in watching TV, particularly among people ages 26 to 42. The so-called Generation Xers filtered 56% of their TV viewing through a DVR.

On mobile phone use, the survey found that a third of the respondents use their cell phones to entertain themselves. More than half of people from ages 14 to 25 used their phones for entertainment, which could include listening to music, watching video, or playing games.

On discs versus downloads, 66% of respondents preferred physical DVDs and CDs when thinking about how they would like to engage in entertainment media in the future. But that doesn't necessarily mean the growth rate of music downloads would slow.

U.S. Internet users downloaded more music from online retailers and peer-to-peer sites in the third quarter this year, as CD sales among the same consumers continued to fall, according to the NPD Group. Apple's online store iTunes is the top music retailer in the United States, surpassing Wal-Mart.

The Deloitte survey also found that nearly six in 10 U.S. consumers would like to easily integrate their televisions with their computers to download or watch online content. Fully 59% of Americans are listening to music online and 52% are watching movies and other videos over the Web, the study found. And 39% of the respondents said they would download more video, if their connection speeds were faster.

Deloitte plans to officially release its survey at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, which runs Jan. 8-11.

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