10 Strange Job Interview Questions Big Tech Companies Ask - InformationWeek

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7/18/2016
07:06 AM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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10 Strange Job Interview Questions Big Tech Companies Ask

Tech companies are notorious for asking bizarre interview questions. Here are 10 such head-scratchers that candidates were asked during job interviews at Google, Apple, Microsoft, and other major tech firms.
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(Image: Pixsooz/iStockphoto)

(Image: Pixsooz/iStockphoto)

As you move forward in your IT career, you'll find yourself in a variety of different professional roles while you build the expertise needed to become a respected technology leader.

For some IT workers, the career path to success may require moving to different cities where the tech scene is booming. For others, it may require building expertise in their chosen field or developing new technical skills.

Regardless of location or job title, all IT professionals face a similar challenge in moving up the corporate ladder -- the job interview. While tech pros are in one of the best industries for landing top jobs, many are in competition with one another to snagging coveted roles at giants like Apple and Google.

[See 8 Free iOS, Android Apps for Job Hunters.]

Despite their skills, many talented IT pros don't receive an invitation to visit their desired tech campus for an in-person interview. But for those who do, it may be difficult to prepare. While some interviews are fairly straightforward, others include some bizarre questions.

Some candidates who have gone through the interview process at tech companies report about their experiences on career website Glassdoor. Their stories indicate many employers ask questions far stranger than the typical "Why do you want this job?"

Here, we share some unusual questions that tech companies such as Microsoft, Expedia, and Oracle have asked interviewees in the hot seat.

How would you answer these questions? What is the strangest question you have been asked in an interview? Feel free to share your thoughts and stories in the comments.

Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio

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RBFOWLER
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RBFOWLER,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/19/2016 | 11:11:22 AM
Re: And what do these question tell us about the candidates?
I think you're wrong.  THese questions all tell the interviewer how well the candiadate can think outside the box.  No matter what our role is, we face new situations on occasion.  How we respond to new situations is a key element in how well we can perform overall.  It's not the ability to find the correct answer.  It's the ability to describe your approach to solving a problem.
LahiruK350
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LahiruK350,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/19/2016 | 11:05:00 AM
Re: Answers
for the last one. 4:4, 2:2 then 1:1 :)
Ron_Hodges
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Ron_Hodges,
User Rank: Moderator
7/19/2016 | 9:10:58 AM
Microsoft question not bad
Actually I rather like the Microsoft question.  It would in all likelihood give an insight into (1) how the person thinks about themselves, and whether that view is justified; and (2) how well they can present ideas in an authentic and compelling way. The others, I agree, are just brain teasers.  I myself get frustrated by many of the questions because I want to explore the constraints and assumptions implicit in the question.  ;-)
mkmalensek
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mkmalensek,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/19/2016 | 9:07:03 AM
Answers
I'd be really interested in what these companies think are good answers to these questions.

 
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
7/19/2016 | 5:41:59 AM
And what do these question tell us about the candidates?
Absolutely nothing! Maybe in a few cases that they can remember the logic puzzlers from childhood.
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