10 Hiring Challenges Confronting CIOs - InformationWeek

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IT Leadership // Team Building & Staffing
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7/28/2016
07:06 AM
Dawn Kawamoto
Dawn Kawamoto
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10 Hiring Challenges Confronting CIOs

CIOs are seeing the highest level of skills shortage since the Great Recession of 2008-09 and other hiring issues, according to the 2016 Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO Survey. Find out where these challenges exist and to what extent.
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(Image: NicoElNino/iStockphoto)

(Image: NicoElNino/iStockphoto)

Around the globe, CIOs report facing the highest level of skills shortage since the Great Recession that began in 2008. Large enterprises are struggling to hire data analytics savants, project managers, and enterprise architecture experts. Small companies are in dire need of workers in big data analytics and development.

But that is only part of the hiring issues that CIOs are facing, according to the recently released 2016 Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO Survey. The survey of 3,352 CIOs and technology leaders across 82 countries was conducted from Dec. 12, 2015 to April 10, 2016.

[See 10 Strange Job Interview Questions Big Tech Companies Ask.]

The survey delved into the skills shortage, as well as the regions that are impacted the greatest by it. Additional results from the survey examined whether CIOs believe they are able to grow their IT teams during this shortage, the degree that IT organizations are seeking to diversify their workforce, and the type of employment they are offering, such as full-time permanent, or full-time contract work.

CIOs are having to deal with these hiring issues at a time when their own role as a top technology executive is fundamentally changing to expand beyond the role of technology strategist to ones of revenue generator and business leader.

Despite these challenges, CIOs must find skilled IT workers in a difficult climate. Is your CIO encountering the same difficulties as the 10 hiring issues cited here?

Dawn Kawamoto is an Associate Editor for Dark Reading, where she covers cybersecurity news and trends. She is an award-winning journalist who has written and edited technology, management, leadership, career, finance, and innovation stories for such publications as CNET's ... View Full Bio

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PeterF028
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PeterF028,
User Rank: Moderator
7/28/2016 | 4:59:37 PM
Challenge is real
When it comes to data, IT doesnt necessarily need everyone to have the skills of a data scientist, yet anyone within today's envionment needs analytical thought process. Peter Fretty, IDG Blogger for SAS Big Data Forum
Azathoth
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Azathoth,
User Rank: Strategist
7/29/2016 | 9:12:10 AM
Re: Challenge is real
There are plenty of people with the skills necessary to fill those jobs.  It just happens that most of them are over 40 years old and considered too expensive to hire.  
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
7/29/2016 | 1:34:11 PM
Re: Challenge is real
That's just it.  There is no "skills shortage" -- and "too expensive" isn't really the right terminology.  Many companies are too cheap and unwilling to pay market rate -- or even close to market rate.

Reminds me of a CISO/CPO-type role I interviewed for.  I was willing to hear them out despite the fact that they weren't paying anything close to market.   The department was in shambles, they were nowhere close to prepared, and the position had like 4 dotted-line bosses.

They boo-hooed about how they couldn't get enough people to interview for the job once those people found out what was budgeted for the position.

Eventually, they hired no one -- and reposted the job with a less impressive title (but with all the same job requirements) in the hopes of getting cheaper and dumber candidates.
RussellS801
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RussellS801,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/29/2016 | 5:19:39 PM
Junk story
No shorage, just no pay and no willingness to train the ones they have. CIO's just like a politiciian, making up execuses to paint a picture that is unrealistic of today's employment opportunities. CIO's just need to say that they spent butt load of money on new data processing, and don't want to pay for experience to analyze it. 
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
7/31/2016 | 7:38:11 AM
Self-inflicted
Many of the companies are located in a 100 mile radius near Silicon Valley. Of course there will be a talent shortage and difficulty hiring when every Dick and Jane start or move their business in that area. Move away from those areas to places that have several top notch tech colleges and much lower wages.

Also, dear CIO's, the 20 year old with two Master's and ten years experience working abroad does not exist. So hire normal people and train them as needed. Instead companies lay off by the thousands, ask the government for tax breaks, and whine around in tech publications that grade A students do not walk into their offices asking to work for 8 bucks an hour, no benefits needed.

I'm in the industry for over 15 years and with much acclaim, yet I see nobody offering me anything nor any generally available openings. Once in a while I get in contact with a company and they do a phone interview first, then a second phone interview, then an in person interview with HR, then an in person interview with management, then another one with the hiring manager, and then another one with peers. That process takes two months or more and I typically bow out before that. I have better things to do than waste my time on interviewing for no real value to the company or me. There should not be more than three rounds of interviews and please schedule them to be on the same day or at least close together. If someone is looking, they are looking for other opportunities as well and they will pick the first good offer and not wait around until you made up your mind.
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
7/31/2016 | 8:00:24 AM
Technology skills shortage
In my view this depends on the job market. As an example it is really difficult to map the right skillset for Linux network engineers. On the other hand there are plenty of developers in terms any language.  What do you think? 
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
7/31/2016 | 8:01:19 AM
Re: Technology skills shortage
I agree with the survey results for Asia Pacific region. I think the main issue here is more skilled workers focus more on jobs based on more develop countries.
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
7/31/2016 | 8:02:04 AM
Re: Technology skills shortage
In today's world most of the companies focus on more digitalized work. Therefore they focus more on people with digital technical skills 
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
7/31/2016 | 8:02:56 AM
Re: Challenge is real
In terms of project management and BA I think it has gone to the world of Agile now. Therefore the requirement for project managers has been reduced. Would you like to add anything here?
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
7/31/2016 | 8:03:33 AM
Retaining staff
Well this should be practiced in any organization despite of the industry. However it is always better to retain the experienced staff.
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