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12/31/2015
07:06 AM
Jessica Davis
Jessica Davis
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Top Priorities For State CIOs: 2016

State government CIOs face many of the same challenges that private sector IT executives do, such as updating systems for a digital world, securing those systems, and leveraging big data. Here are their top 10 priorities, according to NASCIO's annual membership poll.
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10. Disaster Recovery/Business Continuity
The question of disaster recovery and business continuity has been at the bottom of NACSIO's list of priorities for the last few years. 
'It is one of those things that can be difficult to make much progress on,' New Mexico CIO Darryl Ackley said. 'It's a perennial issue, like cyber-security. If something goes wrong and we are not prepared, it will be bad for the state CIO.' 

The issue can also be difficult to explain to other agencies. Some agencies will view outages as IT failures and ask why they should deal with picking up the pieces. Ackley said the challenge is to get agencies to create a game plan for outages instead of focusing on blame. 

According to the priorities list, NASCIO's disaster recovery/business continuity category includes improving disaster recovery, business continuity planning and readiness, pandemic/epidemic and IT impact, and testing. 

(Image: designer491/iStockphoto)

10. Disaster Recovery/Business Continuity

The question of disaster recovery and business continuity has been at the bottom of NACSIO's list of priorities for the last few years.

"It is one of those things that can be difficult to make much progress on," New Mexico CIO Darryl Ackley said. "It's a perennial issue, like cyber-security. If something goes wrong and we are not prepared, it will be bad for the state CIO."

The issue can also be difficult to explain to other agencies. Some agencies will view outages as IT failures and ask why they should deal with picking up the pieces. Ackley said the challenge is to get agencies to create a game plan for outages instead of focusing on blame.

According to the priorities list, NASCIO's disaster recovery/business continuity category includes improving disaster recovery, business continuity planning and readiness, pandemic/epidemic and IT impact, and testing.

(Image: designer491/iStockphoto)

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Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
1/4/2016 | 9:50:34 AM
Re: Agile
I agree, moving too fast too son can cause issues for other projects that might be tied into these new projects.  Often if the entire system isn't taken into consideration, there is some form of hinderance down the road.
SunitaT0
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50%
SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 10:39:11 PM
Re: Different challenges
I really wonder if ROI determines what direction CIOs take. Sometimes they follow ROI blindly, otherwise how would they improve the economy?
SunitaT0
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50%
SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 10:36:20 PM
Re: Agile
@Shakeeb: I don't agree. Moving too fast too soon doesn't result in horizontal expansion which can be disastrous if there is no other backup plan. What if your vertical business model fails. What then?
SunitaT0
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50%
SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 10:34:39 PM
Re: Different challenges
@tzubair But the State CIOs should be having less to worry about because most of them only cater to a small percentage of population. I know ironically though that isn't the case. I wonder what parameters should a state CIO consider to go into a direction.
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 8:29:44 PM
Agile
Adopting to agile methodology will benefit the organization. A sprint will always help in getting a tangible/qualitative product.
shakeeb
50%
50%
shakeeb,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 8:25:52 PM
Re: Different challenges
Correct. It will not be right all the time. I think it's always better to consider a cost benefit analysis.
tzubair
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50%
tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 12:50:36 PM
Different challenges
 

"the cost center of traditional IT versus the business-savvy adviser on Agile development and implementations -- while at the same time navigating cultural, political, and resource challenges."

 

I think it's interesting to see how the challenges for State CIOs are much more difficult in nature and there are a larger number of stakeholders involved that need to be considered. Unlike the corporate CIO which has to balance between cost and performance, the state CIO needs to consider the socio-economic angle as well. What's profitable for only a small faction of the population isn't the right spending of tax-payers money even though it may have a very good ROI. The benefits must extend to the population at large even though the financial viablity might not be as strong.
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