10 Lavish Monuments To Tech Egos - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
IT Leadership // IT Strategy
News
11/15/2013
08:00 AM
Aoife M. McEvoy
Aoife M. McEvoy
Slideshows
100%
0%

10 Lavish Monuments To Tech Egos

How do tech billionaires spend it all? Check out the toys and palatial homes owned by 10 of geekdom's rich and famous.
Previous
1 of 10
Next

It's been a month since Oracle Team USA's sensational comeback to victory in the 34th America's Cup. And in the wake of this win -- given the estimated $100 million that Team USA owner Larry Ellison spent on the race -- we thought it was high time to highlight the biggest tech giants and their staggering displays of wealth.

All but one of the leaders we cover are billionaires. According to Forbes, Ellison's net worth tops the list at $43 billion, followed by Jeff Bezos ($25.2 billion) and Google's Larry Page ($23 billion) and Sergey Brin ($22.8 billion).

Let's start with the Oracle boss. Ellison adds real estate purchases to his collection the way most of us splurge on electronics. His lavish residences around the world reportedly include a 23-acre manse in Woodside, Calif. ($12 million), an equestrian estate ($23 million), a McMansion in Pacific Heights, San Francisco (just less than $4 million), and various properties in Lake Tahoe ($100 million).

The Woodside home was based on a 16th-century Japanese palace and took nine years -- and $200 million -- to build. On the plus side, the Woodside location gives Ellison a pleasant commute to Oracle headquarters in nearby Redwood Shores (roughly 20 minutes, we reckon). Ellison must enjoy driving, though. His many vehicles include an Audi R8, a Lexus LFA, and an Acura NSX. And up until about three years ago, Ellison owned a McLaren F1. He bought the exotic car new in 1995 when it was priced at approximately $970,000. At auction, the Formula One car sold for $3,575,000.

Of course, Ellison, a licensed pilot, owns jets and yachts. His aircraft fleet has included an Italian Marchetti jet, a MiG-29 fighter jet, and a Gulfstream V.

In addition to the Bay Area empires, Ellison also reportedly owns property in Rhode Island, Malibu, Rancho Mirage -- an inland resort town in Southern California, with a golf course to boot -- and Kyoto, Japan. His most outlandish purchase, though, is a Hawaiian island. He allegedly paid $500 million for 98 percent of Lanai last year.

Oh, how the 1 percent lives.

Continue this slideshow for more fun trivia about tech titans' extravagant toys.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Previous
1 of 10
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
WKash
50%
50%
WKash,
User Rank: Author
11/22/2013 | 3:06:24 PM
Musk, Elon Musk: The next 007?
Elon comes closest to a real life Tony Stark.
Tom Murphy
50%
50%
Tom Murphy,
User Rank: Author
11/16/2013 | 1:21:58 PM
Re: Larry, Our Sultan of Brunei
Camber. Funny you should mention the Titanic. There's an old folk song about the ship's sinking that talks about how the champion prize fighter Jack Johnson wasn't allowed to board that ill-fated voyage because he was black.  Here are a few lines:

Jack Johnson wanted to get on board, but the captain said "we don't haul no coal" Fare thee, Titanic, fare the well.

----------

Jack Johnson when he heard the news, ya shudda seen him just shakin' his blues. Fare thee, Titatic, fare thee well.

Jack Johnson when he got the shock, ya shudda seen him doing the Eagle Rock. Fare thee, Titanic, fare thee well.

 

 
Tom Murphy
50%
50%
Tom Murphy,
User Rank: Author
11/16/2013 | 11:50:28 AM
Re: Lavish is an understatement
Nicole, as in NYC where the Bloomberg Administration celebrated the arrival of so many billionaires, there is a growing sense in the Bay Area that the rising tide of technology's elite is making life impossible for the ordinary folks. Rents are suspassing the levels of the dot-com eras, homes are unaffordable, and governments are jacking up fees and sales taxes to pay for public services.  Meanwhile, the wealthy are lobbying for elimination of capital gains taxes -- which is the primary source of taxation on the rich.  (Infamous billionaire Leona Helmsly once observed "Taxes are for the little people.")

This is an unsustainable model. We saw in the 30s and late 60s that the ordinary people will rise up against this. Perhaps DeBlasio's election in NY is the first sign of this. Look for more in the mid-term elections, and in protests coming soon to a city near you. I just hope we can avoid the violence that marked such eras in the past.
Tom Murphy
50%
50%
Tom Murphy,
User Rank: Author
11/16/2013 | 11:43:47 AM
Re: Larry, Our Sultan of Brunei
I don't think so, Camber.  We are in an age where the rich are richer and the poor are poorer.  History tells us this will lead to social discord, as it did in the 30s and the late 60s.  The wealthy will wonder why because they have no idea how this affects the rest of us who work hard just to afford decent housing a healthy environment for our kids.
InformationWeek Is Getting an Upgrade!

Find out more about our plans to improve the look, functionality, and performance of the InformationWeek site in the coming months.

Commentary
New Storage Trends Promise to Help Enterprises Handle a Data Avalanche
John Edwards, Technology Journalist & Author,  4/1/2021
Slideshows
11 Things IT Professionals Wish They Knew Earlier in Their Careers
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  4/6/2021
Commentary
How to Submit a Column to InformationWeek
InformationWeek Staff 4/9/2021
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Successful Strategies for Digital Transformation
Download this report to learn about the latest technologies and best practices or ensuring a successful transition from outdated business transformation tactics.
Slideshows
Flash Poll