6 Ways To Consumerize IT Without Dumbing Down - InformationWeek

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IT Leadership // Enterprise Agility
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9/23/2014
09:06 AM
Himanshu Sareen
Himanshu Sareen
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6 Ways To Consumerize IT Without Dumbing Down

Here's how to make enterprise software more user-friendly while also maintaining its capabilities and security.

The enterprise and consumer spheres of technology have always mixed and mingled, but the direction of influence has been in a constant state of flux, especially in recent years. Where business technology used to be the main vehicle for technological progress, we've seen a tremendous spike in innovations coming from the consumer space.

In the traditional paradigm, the idea of making a complex product conform to consumer usability standards has been thought of as a technological "dumbing-down."

But as platforms like Salesforce, Yammer, and Workday continue to demonstrate, increasing ease-of-use doesn't have to decrease software capability. We can have our cake and eat it too.

[Can you relate to these real-life digital business problems? Read 3 Meltdown Moments In Digital Strategy]

Here are six ways you can consumerize your own IT—without dumbing it down.

1. Don't slouch on security
One of the concerns about consumerization is that it might eschew security in favor of access and convenience. Sure, cloud data might be easier to utilize, but it might also pose a larger risk for your business. Likewise, "Bring Your Own Device" policies have been somewhat difficult to adopt because of the security holes they can poke in an enterprise software infrastructure.

Because of the urgency and reality of security concerns, it's important to make sure that whenever you attempt to consumerize your software, you keep your own system integrity as the top priority. While you shouldn't let these concerns hinder your technological ambitions, it's best to view security as a prerequisite for any effective enterprise platform.

2. Focus on good design and a smooth user experience
Smart devices have changed the way we look at software. Gone are the days when cluttered interfaces and user experiences pass as acceptable. If it's not user-friendly, it's not optimal.

Usually when we think about business software, we think in terms of features. While features are a great rhetorical tool for outlining the specific things that make your software notable, it's important to remember that employees don't work in terms of features. They just want software that helps make their job easier.

One of the most important ways that consumer tech has affected the enterprise is that users now understand what an elegant, intuitive UI looks like. By focusing on quality UX and clean design, you can make your software much more accessible and productive -- without alienating your power users.

3. Use BYOD to increase accessibility
One of the reasons why BYOD has become such an important trend is because of the way it caters to employees' natural workflows. People find it less jarring to bring their own personal devices to work than it is to switch constantly between work and personal devices. While there's been concern about the blurring of the lines between work and life, the truth is that people can still separate the two in ways that enhance both.

By opening up your IT to the possibilities of BYOD, you'll start seeing some instant benefits, such as increased productivity and improved morale. By allowing employees to use their platforms of choice, you accommodate for their preferred workflows and, in general, will find that your employees are

Himanshu Sareen is responsible for the strategic development of Icreon Tech, which specializes in IT consulting, application development for the web and mobile, digital marketing, custom software development, and design and usability. Sareen founded Icreon in 2000 ... View Full Bio
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ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
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9/24/2014 | 9:32:56 AM
Re: Strive being the key word
I really like your emphasis on workflow TerryB -- that's the hard stuff, the stuff that takes really understanding what employees or customers want to do. Stressing UI can give the wrong idea that it's all a design/appearance challenge, but the challenge is really understanding that deep, complete experience.  
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
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9/23/2014 | 3:42:24 PM
Re: Strive being the key word
#2 is one of the most powerful areas IT can thrive -- bringing consumer-grade experiences to business tools. It's about effective UX, but most of that comes from really knowing what end users want and need to do. An action that takes 1-click versus 3-clicks makes a big difference in people's work day.
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
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9/23/2014 | 3:19:03 PM
Re: Strive being the key word
You're right, social networking platforms like Yammer and Chatter are difficult to quantify on an ROI scale. But I've seen them improve team rapport and communication, and speed up workflows. When people communicate better they tend to be happier at work and more productive. "Leap of faith" is a good way to describe integrating Yammer. You go in knowing it'll probably improve worker communication/collaboration, and the natural progression is that measurable productivity gains will follow. But there are no guarantees.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
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9/23/2014 | 2:42:41 PM
Workflow
"...the best software prioritizes employee workflows over raw specs." So true, yet how many of you feel that even a few of your enterprise apps truly respect your everyday workflow?
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