Driverless Cars, AI, Robots: Why CIOs Should Care - InformationWeek

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IoT
IoT
IT Leadership // Digital Business
Commentary
5/20/2015
04:33 PM
Susan Nunziata
Susan Nunziata
Commentary

Driverless Cars, AI, Robots: Why CIOs Should Care

Everybody loves to talk about a future filled with driverless cars, robots to tend to our every need, and artificial intelligence that can solve our problems. But does it all really matter for CIOs?
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(Image: Google)

(Image: Google)

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Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2015 | 9:49:05 AM
Re: New technologies
Susan: Go for it! I really like that idea.
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
5/27/2015 | 1:36:15 AM
Re: New technologies
I read the Fortune's article. It ends with this, that has to be on everyone's mind.

"But first the public must be convinced that the computers, sensors and software that control these new machines will do a superior job of keeping it safe and sound."

Will the driverless car be safer than a car with a driver? My take? They will!
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
5/26/2015 | 2:39:06 AM
Re: New technologies
Apple is researching cars and Tesla is entering the energy infrastructure industry -- disruption is everywhere.

The insurance and financial sector would have been heavily invested into disruptive IT technology by now (not to mean that the sectors are not involved with IT at the moment) but, 2008 and the whole algo trading experience has made the sector to tread carefully. If algo trading at 2008 was considered overkill, it might turn out that the current state of technology of the sector is under-kill.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
5/26/2015 | 2:00:42 AM
Re: New technologies
@Susan, that is a great idea -- airport terminals are one of the areas that could easily be automated since, it involves a lot of repetitive movements. And, users might not worry about the potential disruption to employment that it will cause because, I imagine that the same has already happen when, porters were replaced with conveyor belts to move luggage.

The automation of words through, Wordsmith is an interesting development. I wonder, if Wordsmith has any creativity in it because, every sentence that a human constructs is unique and is relative to the surrounding context. If it is not creative then, it is just a series of logical tests (if this then, that) and users will quickly block the bots.

 
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
5/25/2015 | 3:21:13 PM
Re: New technologies
@ Susan, that's hilarious!! That would be priceless.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/24/2015 | 6:29:16 PM
Re: New technologies
@Angelfuego, @Jastroff--All seriousness aside, what I really want to do is get a driverless car, put my dog in the driver's seat & take off down the highway, then shoot video of the reactions of other drivers.

Is that wrong?

:)
jastroff
IW Pick
100%
0%
jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
5/22/2015 | 3:48:01 PM
Re: New technologies
thanks. as technologists, we tend to overlook the other side of things, i.e,  how things work now, laws, how people live, liability, etc.

I can't say I'd want kids  in a driverless car. Too much risk? 

But, we go on, and we solve the problems, and lawyers get rich, and technologists get frustrated! :-)
Angelfuego
IW Pick
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
5/22/2015 | 3:09:39 PM
Re: New technologies
@ Jastroff, Good point. I never even considered how liability and insurance factors would come into play. It is a realistic and logical concern.
Susan_Nunziata
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50%
Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/22/2015 | 2:23:28 PM
Re: New technologies
@shamika--absolutely not! the key is to balance out the needs of the day-to-day operation of the organization, the planning for realistic needs, and then the forward-thinking futuristic view of where your organization will be in 5,10,15 years. It's the rare person who can be good at all three of these things.
Susan_Nunziata
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50%
Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/22/2015 | 2:21:55 PM
Re: New technologies
@shamika--good point. At the moment the cars drive rather slowly. One speaker at MIT described riding in the driverless car as being about exciting as riding the monorail between terminals in an airport. We have a long way to go.
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