Windows 10: Sneak A Peek At Your Future PC - InformationWeek

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6/4/2015
02:02 PM
Kelly Sheridan
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Windows 10: Sneak A Peek At Your Future PC

Microsoft gives a sneak peek of laptops, tablets and PCs built for the new Windows 10 operating system.
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(Image: Microsoft)

(Image: Microsoft)

Earlier this week we were excited to learn about the definitive launch date for Windows 10. Now Microsoft is hinting at the devices that will roll out after customers start to get their free upgrades.

Windows Insiders running the Insider preview builds already have a sense of what Windows 10 will look like when it becomes available on July 29. Customers will see for themselves in less than two months, when they download the new OS on desktops, laptops, and tablets running Windows 7 SP1 and Windows 8.1 Update.

Windows 10 is promised to transform the user experience across all current Windows devices. But how will it look on devices of the future?

[Windows 10: 5 Key Features for Business]

Nick Parker, vice president of Microsoft's OEM division, gave us a hint at the Computex 2015 conference. In his keynote, Parker discussed how Windows 10 should spark sales of Windows 8.1 devices and showcased a few new products specifically designed to run the new OS.

A range of new devices designed to run Windows 10 include laptops, tablets, hybrid devices and PCs from industry giants like Dell, Acer, HP, Asus, and Toshiba. Parker also highlighted two new PC form factors that aim to turn TVs into computers running Windows 10.

Here's a rundown of the products we can expect to see in the months following the Windows 10 launch:

Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio

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SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/9/2015 | 8:10:05 AM
Re: So last year
This might not be the best example because my vision of the future is a little brighter than the dystopian futures we see large centralized computing taking over the world, but I think of Asimov's The Last Question.  Systems getting larger and larger with access/terminals getting smaller at the same time.  I look at my smart phone and think of the things it can do that the first PC I sat down in front of didn't have a chance of achieving.  We're making access to larger faster systems so much easier that the desktop computer in the home is waning as it's replaced by laptops, tablets and smart phones.  
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
6/8/2015 | 10:44:27 AM
Re: So last year
@SaneIT a 42" display may be over the top, but I think you're right in saying this tech has potential for people who regularly work from home. It'll be interesting to see whether it gets more popular as more people get the option to work remotely.
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
6/8/2015 | 10:18:52 AM
Re: So last year
@pedrogonzales The Surfaces have worked well for me in terms of mobile productivity (lighter than a laptop, easy to carry around) but I'd also like to try the Asus or HP 2-in-1 tablet/laptops. I need a keyboard for productivity, so just a tablet wouldn't cut it.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/8/2015 | 8:08:45 AM
Re: So last year
I don't think that the main stream user is ready for it just yet but I know that I do that.  I have a Chrome Key that I carry with me and when I'm in a hotel room going over my work for the day I pop it into the room's TV and enjoy a nice big screen rather than my laptop screen.  I look at them not at TVs but as monitors, if I have the choice between a 12" screen on my Surface or a 42" screen that's 6' away from me I'll happily take an extra minute to have more screen real estate.  A 42" display is overkill for sure but I'm thinking of things a little closer to 19" or 20" displays that could be embedded into just about anything.  When I go to Vegas I see all the poker machines inside restaurants and think that they could be used as monitors for my tiny PC.  As work from home/remote workers increase this type of thing will start looking more attractive.  I have a few friends who do programming remotely and none of them work for their house every day, they say it would drive them crazy so they do things like work a half day from a local restaurant that has WiFi and opens for breakfast.
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
6/7/2015 | 11:01:33 PM
Re: So last year
The items that impressed me the most are were the 2 in 1 and tablets. I think can they really compete with Apple's Ipad.  They allow you to be productive while, at the same time, portable and easy to carry when traveling.  when I have to travel I do not like to carry a laptop because they are heavy while a microsoft tablet look very convevient.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
6/5/2015 | 4:00:30 PM
Re: So last year
@soozyg,

Very good questions!

As a consumer, I can easily determine if buying each item separate will be a better value than buying an all inclusive one...so I guess we'll see what marketing strategy TV makers will come up with to make it appealing enought to create high demand for it.

Today you can easilly get a Roku for around $50, so it would be interesting to see how this turns out.

Thank you for your comment
soozyg
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soozyg,
User Rank: Ninja
6/5/2015 | 3:47:20 PM
Re: So last year
@mejiac,

So does imbedding mean the TV will be more expensive, less expensive or the same price as it has been? Is Roku just a value add or does adding it drive up the price?
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
6/5/2015 | 3:36:30 PM
Re: So last year
@soozyg,

I read the other day that some TV manufacturers are embedded Roku as part of the TV OS and entertainment features.

So it goes to show that the line between a HTPC and a standalon TV is getting blured (althought the main advantage of having separate systems is the ease to upgrade)
soozyg
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soozyg,
User Rank: Ninja
6/5/2015 | 2:34:18 PM
Re: So last year
@mejiac

I myself am using a dedicated PC with Windows 10 for my kids, and they absolutlely love it, mainly because of the flexibility of being able to watch cable, there own media and youtube with great ease..

yes, I agree, it goes the other way; the computer can be used for multiple things, including as a TV. I do that now and I really like it. 

I'm saying that it won't work that way with a TV. TV's are in bedrooms and lounge areas. People will not reach for their (wireless) keyboards and suddenly start using the TV as a computer. They'll go to their desk for that.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
6/5/2015 | 12:48:01 PM
Re: So last year
@soozyg,

I think the concept of having a PC be a dedicated entertainment is something that it's new, but as you mention hasn't received wide acceptance.

Now, with the use of boxes like Roku and Apple TV (along with Netflix being available in a wide range of devices) I think the trend is picking up speed. So for Microsoft to make it part of it's business strategy is a welcome, since in the past it was considered more of a feature than a highlight.

I myself am using a dedicated PC with Windows 10 for my kids, and they absolutlely love it, mainly because of the flexibility of being able to watch cable, there own media and youtube with great ease..
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