Headsup: Data Breaches Threaten BI - InformationWeek

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Software // Information Management

Headsup: Data Breaches Threaten BI

Data that can't be gathered can't be analyzed. That's why business intelligence pros should start paying attention to the parade of data that's marching out of supposedly secure servers at organizations of every size and stripe.

Data that can't be gathered can't be analyzed. That's why business intelligence pros should start paying attention to the parade of data that's marching out of supposedly secure servers at organizations of every size and stripe.

A recent survey by personalization software vendor ChoiceStream reports that 63% of consumers say they fear for the security of the personal data they provide to Web sites.

It's hard to get BI practitioners to pay attention to IT security, unless their shops are so small that they happen to work on both fronts. But that will change if security snafus start crimping the data flow.

Are consumers already holding back? Not yet, according to the survey; 80% of respondents still want personalized online experiences, so they're likely to continue sharing personal information.

But consumers are fickle. ChoiceStream says only 46% of consumers are now willing to trade demographic data for a more personalized online experience. That's down from 57% last year.

Is it time to panic? Not yet. But it is time for BI practitioners to begin taking notice — and start speaking up — about their in-house IT security practices.

— Ted Kemp, TechWeb


Event Alert

DCI's Business Process Management Conference
Nov. 8-10 , San Diego
www.dci.com

Data Mining Levels I, II, & III
Dec. 5-9, Las Vegas
www.the-modeling-agency.com

Get Smart

Implementing dashboards means putting together a team of business and IT resources, defining user requirements, assessing vendor solutions, buying or building the solution, and deploying it to user satisfaction. The task is challenging, not impossible: But where to begin? Try buying several copies of Enterprise Dashboards — Design and Best Practices for IT by Shadan Malik (John Wiley & Sons, 2005) and giving them to key project business and technology stakeholders. The book is written simply without overwhelming jargon or too much attitude. It's an excellent overview for business users and managers as well as for IT personnel involved in providing dashboard solutions.

— Rajan Chandras

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