IBM, Johnson Controls Eye Smart Buildings - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Software

IBM, Johnson Controls Eye Smart Buildings

Vendors combine facilities management and IT systems to help customers reduce energy costs by as much as 35%.

IBM has teamed up with environmental management specialist Johnson Controls to develop systems designed to make office buildings and other facilities more energy efficient.

Under the plan, IBM will integrate its business analytics software and middleware with Johnson's building control technology. The companies will also offer a range of services options around the offerings.

The aim is to create smart systems that can automatically turn off lights when a building is unoccupied, identify pockets of heat loss, shut off and power up cooling systems as needed, and perform other energy-saving tasks without human intervention.

"This is the result of a long relationship that's benefited both companies," said Clay Nesler, Johnson Controls' VP for Global Energy and Sustainability, in an interview. Nesler noted that the two vendors have previously collaborated on smart systems aimed specifically at the datacenter market.

Johnson will combine IBM Tivoli products and other middleware with its EnNet software to integrate building systems, business systems, and smart grid technologies.

The companies will also pair Johnson Controls' Metasys Sustainability Manager with IBM business analytics and Maximo asset management software to create systems that can provide facilities managers with information that can help them reduce energy waste.

Additionally, Johnson's Energy and Emissions Management System will be married with IBM enterprise reporting tools as a foundation for systems that can calculate and forecast greenhouse gas emissions.

"These capabilities have been available for a long time, but they haven't been widely applied," said Nesler, adding that Johnson Controls' team-up with IBM will eliminate much of the difficult integration work that often kept companies from deploying such systems.

"Both organizations are committed to open standards and Web technologies," said Nesler. "So while this would have required a lot of engineering and R&D work several years ago, we now hope to leverage as many standards as possible," he said.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Slideshows
Data Science: How the Pandemic Has Affected 10 Popular Jobs
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  9/9/2020
Commentary
How to Eliminate Disruptive Technology's Risk
Andrew Froehlich, President & Lead Network Architect, West Gate Networks,  8/31/2020
News
How Analytics Helped Accenture's Pandemic Plans
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  9/1/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
2020 State of DevOps Report
2020 State of DevOps Report
Download this report today to learn more about the key tools and technologies being utilized, and how organizations deal with the cultural and process changes that DevOps brings. The report also examines the barriers organizations face, as well as the rewards from DevOps including faster application delivery, higher quality products, and quicker recovery from errors in production.
Video
Current Issue
IT Automation Transforms Network Management
In this special report we will examine the layers of automation and orchestration in IT operations, and how they can provide high availability and greater scale for modern applications and business demands.
Slideshows
Flash Poll