Google Contributor: Pay To Block Ads - InformationWeek

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11/21/2014
01:56 PM
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Google Contributor: Pay To Block Ads

Google launched a new service that blocks ads on some websites in exchange for a nominal monthly subscription.

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Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
11/24/2014 | 8:02:40 PM
Re: In simple words

"...But would you really pony up? "

@Laurianne    Yours is a really reasonable question.  And to be honest ( which I always am) - I probably would not.  I hate in general to pay for information at all.   I kissed the NY Times and Bloomberg good-bye for this very reason.  I used to love reading their articles and then one day - it was you have to register and pay  and that was that.    

 

I think the NY Times has changed their model some where you still can access information, but I haven't been back to Bloomberg since - just too much information out there if you know how to look for it.    I hate this for online publishers but a new revenue model will show itself soon enough.

Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
11/24/2014 | 7:11:40 PM
Working both sides of the street?
In publishing, this is a new business model. The basic thrust is, Google charges an advertiser to place an ad. Secondarily, it charges your site if you do not want ads placed on it. It's not previously  been possible, say in the world of print publishing, to work both sides of the street at the same time.
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
11/24/2014 | 4:45:15 PM
Re: In simple words
I've been getting Sports Illustrated for 30 years. I used to pay $149 a year for SYSTEMNEWS400, magazine focused on IBM AS400/i5 server and community. I wasn't paying for the paper, made no difference to me if digital or not. That magazine, even digital, is toast now. Must not be many of us left. :-)

I've was getting Computerworld and then your magazine for a long time in print, although they have always been free, guessing supported by ads for a long time. Again, conversion to digital from paper no big deal. I'd probably pay for InfoWeek, great magazine for staying in touch what is going on in industry. Same for IndustryWeek that I subscribe to. Working for manufacturer, keeps me in touch with best practices.

But things like Onion, personally probably not. Doesn't mean not funny though, I only have so much time for reading.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
11/24/2014 | 3:25:56 PM
Re: In simple words
Online publishers would be very happy if people would pay a small subscription fee. But would you really pony up?
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
11/24/2014 | 1:27:06 PM
Re: In simple words
LOL @ TerryB someone has to come up with a cartoon to depict that: the new racket: putting out ads and then offering to sell you protection from them!
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
11/24/2014 | 1:05:29 PM
Re: In simple words
Yeah @zaious, this is pretty bogus stuff. The Onion could survive by simply charging a subscription to people that want to read it, like we did with magazines/newspapers for how many years? This idea you can provide a "free" service but still monetize it has always seemed pretty shady to me.

This new thing with Google is like someone dumping trash in your yard but then telling you for a small monthly fee that they will stop. Didn't someone like Al Capone invent that business model?
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
11/24/2014 | 12:00:16 PM
Re: Whose ads?

I cannot believe what Google is doing here.   I really can't believe it.  This kind of shady business offering from a company that has made billions doing exactly what they offer to stop.   It is simply ludicrous ! 

 I am beginning to loose some respect for Google.   I will continue to use their tools as I always have but this - this really shows me that the concerns in the back of head regarding Google held more truth in them than  even I would like to believe.

 This really is incredible.

Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
11/24/2014 | 10:00:28 AM
Re: In simple words
@zaious If that's how it works, would the pledge of $1-$3 each month go for each subscription service, or does one arrange one flat fee for all of them?
zaious
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zaious,
User Rank: Ninja
11/23/2014 | 6:07:04 PM
In simple words
Sites need Ad revenue to survive. 'The Onion' will not survive if it does not get Ad revenue. Now, I do not want to see Annoying Ads in the site. I would like to pay 'The Onion' few bucks, and Google is now mediating the transaction.
               -This is what I understood. And, I have the freedom not to pay (and see the ads). Does not look very evil (and not very noble). It is just a business model.

Nemos
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Nemos,
User Rank: Strategist
11/23/2014 | 9:54:35 AM
Re: Whose ads?
Of course it is legal but it sounds a bit crazy at the same time. Have in mind that in same cases you can't recognize which is the content and which is the advertisement. From the other hand, as long most of the services from Google remain free of charges to the users I believe we can "tolerate" as users some strange policies as the above.
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