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10/23/2015
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Your Robot Replacement Has Arrived

Robotic process automation can help companies operate more frugally and efficiently, though potentially at the expense of human workers.

These 8 Technologies Could Make Robots Better
These 8 Technologies Could Make Robots Better
(Click image for larger view and slideshow.)

When is a robot not a robot? When it's robotic process automation, or RPA.

In a new research paper, "The IT Function and Robotic Process Automation," the Outsourcing Unit at London School of Economics finds that RPA can provide a variety of business benefits, and it anticipates accelerated deployment in the years to come. The paper followed three case studies of customers of RPA-provider Blue Prism. In addition, Blue Prism partly funded the paper.

RPA is similar to business process management, but it doesn't require developers to create code. It's software.

As implemented by firms such as Automation Anywhere or Blue Prism, RPA allows people to generate code through a menu-driven drag-and-drop visual interface. That code can then handle structured, repetitive tasks like onboarding employees at a large company. Think of it as software that can be trained to operate the business applications a human would use for routine clerical or administrative work.

(Image: Blue Prism)

(Image: Blue Prism)

As the paper explains:

RPA software is ideally suited to replace humans for so called "swivel chair" processes; processes where humans take inputs from one set of systems (for example, email), process those inputs using rules, and then enter the outputs into systems of record (for example, Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems).

Implemented correctly, RPA can make routine human resources work, for example, more efficient and affordable by taking people out of the loop. The report concedes this could reduce the need for human resources employees.

"There would be fewer HR specialists needed overall if the volume of work was constant, but those HR specialists remaining should have more challenging work," the paper says.

This acknowledgement underscores the angst surrounding advancements in automation and artificial intelligence: Technology may allow people to focus on higher-value, less easily automated work, but it's not clear whether there will be enough of these improved jobs to go around. Nor is it obvious that what cannot be automated today will remain the province of people tomorrow.

RPA occupies a middle ground between shadow IT -- tools deployed without the oversight of IT -- and traditional IT. The paper characterizes it as "lightweight IT" in the sense that it can be begin as a project that doesn't require IT involvement, but may need IT support as it spreads through an organization. Though it tends to be business-led, it's clearly an option that IT should evaluate.

[See the real-world application of RPA. Read Using RPA in Banking to Streamline Development.]

Despite its employment implications, there's little doubt that companies can find value in RPA. The paper notes that some companies surveyed have automated more than 35% of their back-office transactions. The benefits include reduced costs, greater process efficiency and accuracy, and improved customer satisfaction.

Having analyzed the financial impact of RPA deployments at Telefonica O2, Xchanging, and an unnamed major utility, the paper cites ROI figures of 650% to 800% over three years for Telefonica OS, 30% per process (14 automated) for Xchanging, and 200% over one year for the utility.

However, the paper doesn't explore the challenge of asking people to train their computers to replace them.

Thomas Claburn has been writing about business and technology since 1996, for publications such as New Architect, PC Computing, InformationWeek, Salon, Wired, and Ziff Davis Smart Business. Before that, he worked in film and television, having earned a not particularly useful ... View Full Bio

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Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
10/23/2015 | 2:40:38 PM
Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
I have no doubt that Robot Process Automation or software doing lightweight IT can replace repetitive human tasks, particularly the "swivel chair" tasks cited. And that will lead to layoffs. But the fact remains that much higher level work remains undone, even at successful businesses, because no one can get to it. Surrounding products with more intelligent customer service might be a start.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
10/23/2015 | 5:27:55 PM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
Agreed, Charlie. But there are two issues I see. 1) The people who will lose their jobs aren't trained to do the work still to be done and it is goign to hurt. 2) I'm fine with us all losing our jobs and letting the robots run the Earth, but the transition to that is goign to be rough.
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
10/24/2015 | 1:38:52 AM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone

@David I am surprised with your second point. Are you sure that you are really comfortable with robots running our jobs. I am pretty much concerned at the present state of unemployment even with the living beings and then over and above giving the employed place  to robots, you are asking for chaos. I am sure the robots will be fine in doing a precision or jobs required heavier demands but leaving everything to them does not sound comfortable to me.

PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
10/24/2015 | 12:29:22 PM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
I wouldn't mind for robots to take care of the dull and repetitive work; as long as companies have programs where people can transition into jobs that would allow them to contribute to new ways to the organization.  I think there will always be a place for humans,  even in the most robot friendly organization like German or Japanese car manufactures, the role of a human is crucial to make sure the factory work as planned.  Do people here think that robots could take over all jobs in an organization?
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
10/26/2015 | 8:15:16 AM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
Maybe not every job but playing devil's advocate here, what if they can take half of human jobs?  What do countries with 50% unemployment look like?  We talk about financial divides now, imagine what it would be like which half of the workforce unemployed.  I think this is part of David's overly simplified statement about it being a rough transition, the very beginning of this process would hurt a lot of people.  How quickly that shift in the economy could recover isn't something I've heard a lot about but if it takes as little as a few years the damage would still be incredible. 
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
10/26/2015 | 12:44:15 PM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
@saneIT- Yeah, that's exactly what I was getting at.
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
10/30/2015 | 1:14:56 PM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
@saneIT- thanks for the clarification.  I think this is already happening in some countries.  This remains me to what happened to Spain a couple of years ago, they had 30% unemployment. Many people people migrated to other countries for work in huge numbers.  For those that stayed, people with master degree were waiting tables as it was the only job they could find.  I think if this scenario occurs in the U.S, we should have programs for people to stay busy and active, for example, volunteering, and support networks.  Also, crazy political leaders appear when people are desparate. 

 
Ashu001
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Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
10/26/2015 | 1:15:37 PM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
SaneIT,

We already have such countries on the Planet today in Greece and Portugal.

Its a difficult to live in-Absolutely no doubt about it but moving towards a more sustainable lifestyle can make this happen for sure.

No Doubts about it.

If you grow a significant percentage of your Food yourself in sustainable fashion the need to earn Money automatically dimnishes.

Does'nt it?

 
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
10/27/2015 | 10:10:30 AM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
I agree that it can be done, the issue is the pain that comes before we get our feet back under ourselves.  Even if you grow all of your own food that doesn't pay the mortgage you took out 5 years before a fleet of robots took every job you're qualified to perform.  I've heard some things like "living wages" paid to citizens just to survive once the workforce needs are dropped so dramatically but I just don't see that going over well at all.
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Author
10/28/2015 | 12:23:56 PM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone

 

While I understand the fear of robots that seems to permeate the reality is that some tasks are better suited to robots and it does enable individuals to advance beyond jobs that are rote and usually low paying. Robots and technology in general tend to complete these jobs with more ease and with greater efficiency for our future generations we need to help them understand and focus on the jobs that involve them personally not those that are better suited to automation.

Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
10/29/2015 | 8:07:31 AM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
While I don't doubt that automation is going to put a lot of people out of work, I hope it raises the overall quality of available jobs as they require the sort of tasks humans are good at: improvising, creativity, empathy. As it stands there are far too many jobs that force people to act like robots. While the transition will be rough, it would be nice if those people could do something with a little more excitement to it.
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
10/29/2015 | 9:04:15 AM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
Yes, I agree that robot automation will likely impact jobs pretty far down on the food chain, and increase the quaility and complexity of jobs required to support the automation. I would think the majority of the people on a forum like this would be a beneficiary of such change.
Ashu001
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Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
11/16/2015 | 10:40:41 PM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
SaneIT,

The Living Wages deal scares the heck out of me!

Don't we already have something like that in US and Europe today?

I have seen studies which clearly show that it makes more sense for someone to survive on Benefits rather than work if they earn less than 50,000 Dollars /Year.

I would rather pay these folks to do something which actually adds Genuine value to Society like Growing their own food or Reducing their own Weight(Do not forget that America is the No.1 Obese Nation on the planet today) rather than pay them just for sitting around watching TV whole day.

Makes more sense to me personally.

 

 
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
11/17/2015 | 8:35:41 AM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
I think you're asking if we currently have working poor in the US and Europe and if that's what you're asking then yes we have that problem.  The average American wage earner alone would be below the poverty level for a family of 4, so a single parent with some kids is working what sounds like a good job but they aren't making enough to save.  Those that will lose jobs to machines will need some kind of re-training because there are going to be a lot of families who rely on that income to keep them above the poverty line.  Community gardening is nice and all but I think we would be best served to increase a civil service plan.  We have an aging infrastructure, bankrupt cities that can't keep up with servicing residents, etc.  Shifting the resources from the private sector to the government sector or private contractors doing government type jobs seems very likely.
Ashu001
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Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
11/17/2015 | 11:54:01 PM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
SaneIT,

While I agree wholeheartedly with your opinion(Shifting everything back onto the Public Sector is the likely solution);I wonder if that's the best way to go about things today in America.

When you say a bigger Civil Service plan ;the problem is that leads Warmongers in Chief to drag innocent Civilians to fight wars in faraway places for their personal Profitable Needs.

I am totally OPPOSED to this happening.

And I keep trying to educate more and more folks around us to understand this very serious and Grave issue.

 
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
11/18/2015 | 8:20:01 AM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
I'm not looking at civil service as a military group but as a homebound missionary group.  When machines take over jobs at McDonald's I have to believe that some of the people working there could be trained to do some hands on work with civil projects like construction and renovation of aging infrastructure.   Or they could be doing clerical work for nonprofit groups.  There are a lot of options but the funding has to be there and as a country we really need to be looking at the cost of retraining the current workforce.
Ashu001
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Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
11/19/2015 | 6:54:58 AM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
SaneIT,

Agree partially with you are saying here.

However,how do we ensure that the Government does'nt spend all the money it prints or raises through Taxes on its various war-mongering Efforts overseas???

As long as we let Lobbyists control who becomes the Next President and all our Congressmen(its been routine for the last 30 years now) ;Nothing else will matter.

Best option is to starve the beast called Government by not giving it the funds in the first place.

 
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
11/19/2015 | 9:08:49 AM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
I don't know that I want to get too political in nature with this discussion but there are few entities with enough reach to address what will be a massive shift in the work place.  Jobs at many levels will disappear, from entry level cashiers to paralegals to accountants and researchers.  All of those people are going to be fighting in a shrinking job market. 
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
10/26/2015 | 12:40:39 PM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
@nomii- I'm quite sure in some future world, there will be no need for humans to work. We'll build robots that do the work, even robots that design and repair future robots. We'll all lie around and be fed bon bons by robots and do art and science all day for fun and human improvement. Like Star Trek but with better robots. There is no reason whatsoever that we should have to work just to be employed and make money. 

The problem is not building a robot that can replace us all and free us up to live a nice life. We will eventually make robots that can do anything.

The problem is when we have robots for half the jobs. Because the jobs we'll replace first are the low paying jobs. We'll create a terrible class war between people who still have a job and those that don't. And we'll use words like freeloader and drag on the economy and all of that. We already see it in the elections in the US now. 

What do you do when you have more people than people you need to employ to make the world work? That's scary. But it isn't scary at all to have a world where no one needs to work, because you'll change your view of money and goods enitrely.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
10/26/2015 | 12:40:40 PM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
@nomii- I'm quite sure in some future world, there will be no need for humans to work. We'll build robots that do the work, even robots that design and repair future robots. We'll all lie around and be fed bon bons by robots and do art and science all day for fun and human improvement. Like Star Trek but with better robots. There is no reason whatsoever that we should have to work just to be employed and make money. 

The problem is not building a robot that can replace us all and free us up to live a nice life. We will eventually make robots that can do anything.

The problem is when we have robots for half the jobs. Because the jobs we'll replace first are the low paying jobs. We'll create a terrible class war between people who still have a job and those that don't. And we'll use words like freeloader and drag on the economy and all of that. We already see it in the elections in the US now. 

What do you do when you have more people than people you need to employ to make the world work? That's scary. But it isn't scary at all to have a world where no one needs to work, because you'll change your view of money and goods enitrely.
Ashu001
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Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
10/26/2015 | 1:10:13 PM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
David,

There are some serious problems with that sceanario(as you have outlined) playing out.

For One)How do you replace the Invisible Hand of the Market in Pricing various Goods and Services if everyone just stops working?

Depending on the Government to take up this responsibility instead won't help matters for most concerned simply because Governments can and usually are easily corrupted.

So what do we do to solve this situation?

I have a slightly different take.

In the future we will have only 4 Classes of Jobs

1)Government Related Jobs

2)People Related Jobs

3)Animals/Nature Related Jobs

&

4)Technology related Jobs.

 

Everyother type of job will become obsolete going ahead.

 
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
10/26/2015 | 1:31:07 PM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
@ashu001- I'm not 100% sure the invisible hand even operates as expected these days. Even Smith suggested it had its limits. The economy, as Gartner said two weeks ago, is increasing run by algorithms. They might be the new invisible hand. 

At any rate, there may simply be no market at the point of 100% robot takeover. It may be paradise or the opposite. It may be like we're adult babies in a giant robot day care with nothing to do all day. I don't know.

The one thing that is true as much as it is fun to be futurist about it is that we've got a very real transition to make before we get close to robot nirvana. It is the task of yet again, rethinking what work means. We've done it before. The industrial revolution chaned work in so many ways we had to create a concept of a work week of 40 hours instead of one run by the seasons.

We will need to rethink work in the information age more than we've been willing to do so far.
Ashu001
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Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
10/26/2015 | 1:42:21 PM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
David,

I hope you are not trying to suggest here that people will get obsolete if they don't reinvent themselves according to the Needs of the Robotic Nirvana Age ?

That sceanario would be to frightening for me personally.

It would be as if Human Opinion and needs no longer mattered to take care of Humans .

Frightening,Frightening sceanrio indeed!

 
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
10/26/2015 | 2:05:02 PM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
I don't know about obsolete, but not needed to make the planet run. I firmly believe we can always reinvent ourselves. But I have to say that only some of us are capable of thinking deeply enough to be scientists, artists etc. One wonders what the rest of us will do. Will we suddenly realize we have gifts we've never known about? Will we educate ourselves differently and find new things to do? Will we sit around doing nothing because we can? In a world where nothing is required of you, what do you do because you want to? It is a very interesting question.
Ashu001
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Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
11/16/2015 | 10:36:32 PM
Re: Layoffs, yes, but many higher level tasks remain undone
David,

On a Deeply philosophical level it is really a big-big deal.

I doubt most folks have the Thinking capacity to visualize what that world will look like.

I have a feeling it will look a lot like the World of "Minority Report".

LOL!

 
Ashu001
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Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
10/26/2015 | 1:35:33 PM
If you think Ordinary Americans are going to take this Automation lying down you gotta shock coming.
If one only looks at the all the recent lawsuits filed by Ordinary American IT/Accountant workers when their jobs got outsourced to people thousands of miles away(The Disney lawsuit was the most famous case);One realizes that ordinary Americans are made out of sterner stuff and just won't stand down when faced with such an eventuality.

Sure,Automation will get more aggressive going ahead but its likely to come about only in Areas where the People let it.

Anything more is expecting too much .

 
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