Microsoft Streamlines Visual Studio Pricing, Structure - InformationWeek

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4/1/2015
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Microsoft Streamlines Visual Studio Pricing, Structure

In looking to make life a little easier for developers, Microsoft is streamlining its Visual Studio offerings, and detailing a new pricing structure.

Microsoft 'Project Spartan': Hands-On Demo
Microsoft 'Project Spartan': Hands-On Demo
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This week, Microsoft simultaneously beefed up and streamlined its Visual Studio suite of software, by combining Visual Studio Premium and Visual Studio Ultimate into one single offering called Visual Studio Enterprise with Microsoft Developer Network (MSDN).

In addition to Visual Studio Community and Visual Studio Professional with MSDN, the Enterprise edition with MSDN rounds out the three primary Visual Studio 2015 offerings.

Features previously available online on the top-tier editions are also moving down the chain, such as CodeLens, which helps users find references and changes to code, linked bugs, work items, code reviews, and unit tests.

CodeLens will know be offered in Visual Studio Professional, while the Community edition will receive support for PowerPoint storyboarding.

(Image: Microsoft)

(Image: Microsoft)

With the announcements this week, Microsoft is also allowing users who have an active subscription for Visual Studio Premium with MSDN or Visual Studio Ultimate with MSDN to get automatic upgrades to Enterprise with MSDN.

Visual Studio Community 2015 will be offered for free, while the professional edition lists for $1,199 ($799 for renewal). Visual Studio Enterprise 2015 lists at $5,999 ($2,569 for renewal), although Microsoft Volume Licensing resellers might offer additional discounts.

Microsoft will continue to offer Visual Studio Professional, Team Foundation Server, Team Foundation Server Express, Visual Studio Express, and MSDN Platforms as a part of the company’s Visual Studio 2015 and MSDN portfolio.

Studio Professional with MSDN includes subscription benefits such as access to core software for development and testing, Team Foundation Server, Visual Studio Online Basic, $50 a month in Azure credits, training, and support.

The Enterprise edition lets users build applications at scale with features such as Load Testing, automated and manual testing, and IntelliTest capabilities. It includes $150 a month in Azure credits.

Powered by cloud services, Visual Studio Community 2015, which is offered for free, is targeted at application developers outside the enterprise for platforms such as Android, iOS, and, of course, Microsoft Windows.

The suite of software, tools, and services offers advanced debugging, profiling, and automated and manual testing, as well as development and operations (DevOp) software with automated deployments and continuous monitoring.

[Find out what IT and CIOs should know about the end of IE.]

Community also offers free open-source projects, academic research, training, education, and small professional teams.

A promotional offer allows users to upgrade from Professional with MSDN or Test Professional with MSDN to Premium with MSDN for half-off, with a free automatic upgrade to Enterprise with MSDN when the company releases Visual Studio 2015 in May.

Organizations interested in trying a preview version can access Microsoft's pre-release download page and leave feedback.

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Nathan Eddy is a freelance writer for InformationWeek. He has written for Popular Mechanics, Sales & Marketing Management Magazine, FierceMarkets, and CRN, among others. In 2012 he made his first documentary film, The Absent Column. He currently lives in Berlin. View Full Bio

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Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
4/6/2015 | 2:11:34 PM
Re: Added functions

After some additional information provided by MS and letting the piece by Nathan sink in, I finally got the message and I do really like the Community Edition so far.  

 

It is brand new and it is nice to have everything in one place.  Now on to learning Python and C#.

SKDEV
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SKDEV,
User Rank: Moderator
4/2/2015 | 6:56:50 PM
Re: Added functions
I purchased Visual Studio Professional 2013 without msdn for $499 and would happily pay the same again for for the 2015 edition, however given that the new one is $1199, the 2013 edition might very well be the last edition I purchase unless they change their mind and offer it without MSDN.

 ** Update. I just noticed this is available..
Visual Studio Professional 2015 standalone license, for customers interested in a non-subscription, IDE-only option

Make that $499 or less, and I'm in.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Technocrati
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50%
Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
4/2/2015 | 12:34:53 PM
Re: Added functions
@Somedude8    Just downloaded Community yesterday, in a effort to code Python.  With all of these version of VS, I am getting confused.
Somedude8
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Somedude8,
User Rank: Ninja
4/2/2015 | 11:57:38 AM
Re: Added functions
Currently being a freelance programmer, I have to say hello Community Edition!

For more MS-centric shops though, its a bit different. It seems to get folded in to some vague pile of licensing that nobody can really figure out, so after all the OS licenses and SQL and TFS and Sharepoint and reams of other things, who knows what it really costs.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
4/1/2015 | 5:59:56 PM
Re: Added functions
Not being a user of Visual Studio, I find it hard to tell whether the price is worth it. Anyone out there paying $1200 or $6000 who wants to weigh in on whether the price is reasonable?
danielcawrey
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50%
danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
4/1/2015 | 2:37:52 PM
Added functions

I think this is a great move from Microsoft. Rather than waiting for third party vendors to add this functionality, I think it's really smart for Microsoft to add these tools directly into Visual Studio. This makes the suite a lot more functional overall. 

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