Rough Week For Satellites - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
News

Rough Week For Satellites

This hasn't been a good week for some satellite makers. Satelites Mexicanos SA's Solaridad I satellite went quiet Sunday, disrupting service to automatic bank tellers, radios, televisions, beepers, and telephones throughout North and Central America. The $250 million Solaridad I, launched in 1993 and expected to last through 2006, now joins the rest of the space junk orbiting Earth, while Satmex works to redirect services for the satellite's 107 clients and commission the creation of a replacement satellite to be launched within the next two years.

Satellite manufacturer and service provider Loral Space & Communications Ltd., which owns 49% of Satmex, is the most likely candidate to build a replacement for the Solaridad I space ghost, which was built by Hughes Electronics Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of General Motors Corp. Loral, however, is facing a more earthly conundrum: The company's engineers damaged a Sirius-4 satellite they're building for Sirius Satellite Radio Inc.

Although Loral is responsible for any costs associated with repairs to the Sirius-4, further details on the cause and extent of the damage will not be released until an investigation is completed in September, according to a Sirius spokeswoman. Sirius is building a system to broadcast up to 100 channels of music and talk radio across the United States.

Unplanned satellite outages are rare and usually occur immediately after launch, when few customers are affected, says Ron England, president of media distribution for Media DVX Inc., a privately held distributor of media content. Outages are more likely to affect smaller content receivers and distributors that rely on a single satellite for sending and receiving information. Says England, "Larger broadcasters generally buy transponders on different satellites, so if one goes down there isn't a major interruption to service."

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
Download this report to compare how cloud usage and spending patterns have changed in 2020, and how respondents think they'll evolve over the next two years.
News
Top 10 Data and Analytics Trends for 2021
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  11/13/2020
Commentary
Where Cloud Spending Might Grow in 2021 and Post-Pandemic
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  11/19/2020
Slideshows
The Ever-Expanding List of C-Level Technology Positions
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  11/10/2020
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Why Chatbots Are So Popular Right Now
In this IT Trend Report, you will learn more about why chatbots are gaining traction within businesses, particularly while a pandemic is impacting the world.
White Papers
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Sponsored Video
Flash Poll