Questions Abound With Verizon's Open Network Announcement

Until details such as per-message use fees and CDMA access are answered, reaction is muted.



INDUSTRY BUY-IN:
Microsoft, among others, hailed the announcement, but where are the Open Handset Alliance members? Why aren't they cheering this initiative? Granted, Verizon didn't exactly sign up for the OHA and start promoting Google's Android platform, but it has opened up the possibility that Android can be used on its network. Isn't that worth a pat on the back from the OHAers? Of that crowd, only Google has offered any kind words.

--Eric Zeman

THE REAL CHALLENGE:
Whether or not you can use your preferred handset, it would be nice to fire up the wireless application of your choice--or, better yet, devise one of your own. But, again, such apps might not amount to much if they're constrained by onerous per-message or data-transfer charges--and there's no sign Verizon's doing away with such fees anytime soon.

--Serdar Yegulalp

VERIZON'S CDMA NETWORK:
Unlike devices that run on AT&T and T-Mobile's GSM networks, where a SIM card associates customers with their service and can be moved freely from one device to another, CDMA devices require carrier assistance and approval. So, even if a customer buys his own CDMA-compatible phone, the CDMA carrier such as Verizon or Sprint Nextel might not activate the phone if it isn't on its "approved" list. This Verizon announcement just brings it into parity with GSM carriers.

--Frank Bulk

Return to the story:
Verizon Opens Its Network

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