Nvidia Goes Cross-Platform With Motherboard GPUs For Intel - InformationWeek

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Nvidia Goes Cross-Platform With Motherboard GPUs For Intel

With Intel more willing to work with Nvidia, the company has gone ahead with the new chipsets, which are Nvidia's first cross-platform integrated processors.

Nvidia, which has offered integrated graphics technology on motherboards using chips from Advanced Micro Devices, plans to do the same for the Intel platform starting in the third quarter.

The company's cross-platform, motherboard technology is set to be introduced within the GeForce 7-Series product line. The first two products will be the GeForce 7050 PV and 7025, which were introduced Friday at the CeBit trade show in Germany.

In the past, Nvidia has sold graphics cards that are added separately to Intel motherboards, while also offering integrated graphics for AMD boards, Nvidia product manager David Ragones said in an interview from CeBit. That strategy, however, has changed as a result of AMD's $5.4 billion acquisition last fall of graphics chipmaker ATI Technologies. "With the merger, there was an opening in the market," Ragones said.

With Intel more willing to work with Nvidia, the latter company has gone ahead with the new chipsets, which are Nvidia's first cross-platform integrated processors. Calling the new products "motherboard GPUs," Ragones said the technology is set to ship for Intel motherboards in the third quarter, and for AMD panels next month.

The GeForce 7050 PV includes a high-definition multimedia interface, or HDMI, which is an all-digital audio/video input/output connection for recording high-definition content on a PC and streaming it to an HD TV. The 7025, which does not have an HDMI, is built for displaying video and graphics on a computer display.

Both products include Nvidia's PureVideo technology, which processes video instead of the computer's general CPU in order to make the system as a whole run faster. They also support DirectX 9, a collection of application programming interfaces in Microsoft Windows for handling multimedia tasks. In addition, the chipsets support the use of multiple displays on a computer.

Nvidia recently released a DirectX software development kit.

Pricing for the GeForce 7050 PV is expected to run between $70 and $80, with the 7025 from $50 to $70. Computers configured for the chipsets would probably cost between $500 and $1,000, Ragones said.

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