Why I Really Need A Mac To Enjoy My iPhone - InformationWeek

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Commentary
7/19/2007
02:25 PM
Stephen Wellman
Stephen Wellman
Commentary
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Why I Really Need A Mac To Enjoy My iPhone

After weeks of waiting, I finally got my hands on my very own iPhone. Playing with my iPhone has been so much more satisfying than using my neighbor's iPhone. I have one big problem with my new toy, though. It doesn't sync very well with my personal PC.

After weeks of waiting, I finally got my hands on my very own iPhone. Playing with my iPhone has been so much more satisfying than using my neighbor's iPhone. I have one big problem with my new toy, though. It doesn't sync very well with my personal PC.That's right, like most of the U.S., I am a PC user. Now after smacking down $600 for an iPhone and waiting weeks to get it, I expected the darned thing to actually work with my PC. It sort of works with my PC, but it gives me headaches when I try to use it with Outlook (and based on this forum, I am not alone). My iPhone also doesn't know what to do with some of my files.

I admit it hasn't been all pain. Using my iPhone is, in many ways, a dream. Websites look great in the browser and the iPhone is a speedy darling on my Wi-Fi network. Now I don't use .Mac for e-mail, so I am probably missing out on mobile e-mail too.

I realize that the iPhone is designed to work like a dream with Macs and that's why it makes me want to buy one. A Mac that is. In fact, the iPhone may be a perfect Mac/smartphone link. My neighbor, ever the Apple evangelist, was quick to point out how well his iPhone works with his MacBook. For me, the experience has been fun, but far from the bliss I expected for $600.

Let's get down to brass tacks: I paid $600 for an iPhone and now this smartphone makes me want to go out and buy a MacBook. Sorry, but I can't afford to spend another $1,100 right now. I feel like owning an iPhone without owning a Mac is little like owning a sportscar but not being able to drive faster than 60.

So I have to make a decision. Do I go out and buy a MacBook and experience the true joys of Mac sync with my iPhone? Do I return my iPhone and go back to being one those people who use a primitive smartphone, like my old Treo? Or do I just have to live with my iPhone's poor connection with my PC? What do you think I should do?

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