Verizon Wireless's Walled Garden Comes Tumbling Down - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Mobile
Commentary
11/27/2007
09:10 AM
Eric Ogren
Eric Ogren
Commentary
50%
50%

Verizon Wireless's Walled Garden Comes Tumbling Down

Holy cell towers, Batman! In a stunning announcement, Verizon Wireless has promised that customers will be able to use "any app, any device" on its network starting next year. Is this the end of the walled garden as we know it?

Holy cell towers, Batman! In a stunning announcement, Verizon Wireless has promised that customers will be able to use "any app, any device" on its network starting next year. Is this the end of the walled garden as we know it?Up until today, Verizon Wireless has retained more control over its network of services and devices than its three large competitors. No other carrier had a walled garden that stood so high. In fact, many of Verizon's competitors have lowered the walls to their own gardens by a few blocks. That is all set to change.

This morning Verizon Wireless broke the news that it will let its customers use the devices, applications, and software of their choice on its network. Wow.

This is how it is going to work:

In early 2008, the company will publish the technical standards the development community will need to design products to interface with the Verizon Wireless network. Any device that meets the minimum technical standard will be activated on the network. Devices will be tested and approved in a $20 million state-of-the-art testing lab which received an additional investment this year to gear up for the anticipated new demand. Any application the customer chooses will be allowed on these devices.

This new option goes beyond just a change in the design, delivery, purchase, and provisioning of wireless devices and applications.

Of course, customers will still be limited to phones based on CDMA technology. This means that any device that uses the Sprint network, for example, could be used on Verizon's network instead.

Verizon says it will not change its existing retail sales channels at all, and customers will still be able to go to Verizon Wireless stores and purchase phones and services just as they do now. It is simply offering customers who don't want to be limited to the current handset or application selection the opportunity to use the device that will make them happy. Thank goodness, says I. This will equate the freedom that GSM-based users have had for years and should level the playing field in that respect.

This also is Verizon finally owning up to the reality of what wireless networks will become: dumb pipes that are used simply to access data and the Internet.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
News
Top 10 Data and Analytics Trends for 2021
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  11/13/2020
Commentary
Where Cloud Spending Might Grow in 2021 and Post-Pandemic
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  11/19/2020
Slideshows
The Ever-Expanding List of C-Level Technology Positions
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  11/10/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
Download this report to compare how cloud usage and spending patterns have changed in 2020, and how respondents think they'll evolve over the next two years.
Video
Current Issue
Why Chatbots Are So Popular Right Now
In this IT Trend Report, you will learn more about why chatbots are gaining traction within businesses, particularly while a pandemic is impacting the world.
Slideshows
Flash Poll