Verizon Wireless Teaches Retail Reps How To Bash The G1 - InformationWeek

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10/31/2008
01:55 PM
Eric Ogren
Eric Ogren
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Verizon Wireless Teaches Retail Reps How To Bash The G1

Not one to sit on its laurels, Verizon Wireless is taking the interest in T-Mobile's G1 Android phone seriously by providing its sales reps with ammunition to shoot it down. Another list of "talking points" has been circulated, and it tells us what Verizon really thinks of the G1.

Not one to sit on its laurels, Verizon Wireless is taking the interest in T-Mobile's G1 Android phone seriously by providing its sales reps with ammunition to shoot it down. Another list of "talking points" has been circulated, and it tells us what Verizon really thinks of the G1.Verizon Wireless submitted a similar set of talking points bashing the iPhone earlier this year. Now that the HTC G1 is on everyone's radar (and Verizon is set to release the BlackBerry Storm), the nation's No. 2 carrier wants to be sure everyone has the real scoop on what the G1 offers ... and what it doesn't.

Naturally, Verizon targets T-Mobile's limited 3G network. By the end of 2008, T-Mobile will have only 27 markets with active 3G up and running. Verizon Wireless' 3G footprint is vast.

Other features that Verizon targets include the G1's limited on-board memory (128 Mb), lack of support for Microsoft Exchange, no ability to provide turn-by-turn directions, lack of stereo Bluetooth and video capture, and the G1's limited ability to purchase music over the air.

Verizon also takes a stab at the Android Market, saying that it has no guidelines for quality, usability, interface, or performance for applications.

Finally, Verizon makes sure to point out that the open operating system provides ne'er-do-wells with more than enough opportunity to breach the security of the G1. That's sure to push the buttons of IT admins.

My guess is that people who are interested in Android and the G1 are not necessarily the type to buy a BlackBerry smartphone.

Incidentally, in December 2007, Verizon Wireless said it would welcome the Android operating system to its network at some point.

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