iPad Docking Station With Built-In Pico Projector Debuts At CES 2011 - InformationWeek

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1/5/2011
09:47 PM
Fritz Nelson
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iPad Docking Station With Built-In Pico Projector Debuts At CES 2011

At CES 2011, WowWee Consumer Products showed off a tiny pico projection system that easily projects content from an Ipad, iPhone, iPod and other devices onto a wall or ceiling. "Cinemin Slice" can project a very clear image up to 60 inches in size.

WowWee, probably known best for its line of toys, like its Robots and its cool paper guitars, launched Cinemin Slice, which incorporates the company's Swivel pico projector into a media docking station. The product, launched at CES this week has a connector for Apple's iPod, iPhone and iPad, can also project from any device that provides video out; the company includes connectors for Android devices, PCs and Macs, for example.

The device includes 6-watt stereo speakers, although I was unable to really hear anything given the noisy environment of a trade show floor. The company claims the unit delivers "big sound." It can display images of up to 60 inches, although a company representative said it could provide decent quality at 72 inches. Quality is obviously enhanced in dimly lit rooms (or dark rooms), and is best projected at about six feet, according to WowWee. In its demonstration in a poorly lit ballroom (and on the typical urine-yellow wall), the video quality was merely decent. We're promised it's much better on a projection screen or a blank white wall.

The pico projector uses DLP technology from Texas Instruments; its ability to swivel (90 degrees) will likely give users some flexibility. The product will be available some time in the first quarter, and will cost $429. It will be available on the WowWee site, as well as retail outlets to be named later.

To see the rest of InformationWeek's articles, videos and image galleries covering the 2011 Consumer Electronics Show, be sure to visit our CES 2011 Special Report. Also, be sure to sign-up to be notified when TechWeb launches all of its consumer tech coverage on BYTE.com, led by BYTE editor Gina Smith.

Fritz Nelson is the editorial director for InformationWeek and the Executive Producer of TechWebTV. Fritz writes about startups and established companies alike, but likes to exploit multiple forms of media into his writing.

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