Intel's Arduino 101: 11 Reasons You Need It - InformationWeek

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10/20/2015
07:05 AM
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Intel's Arduino 101: 11 Reasons You Need It

Intel has announced the new Arduino 101, an Arduino platform based on the Intel Curie module. While it's aimed primarily at the education and maker communities, there are plenty of commercial applications, including the opportunity to experiment with Internet of Things (IoT) projects, including wearables, diminutive gadgets, and sensors
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The Genuino 101 (Arduino 101 in the US) was introduced at the 2015 Rome Maker Faire.
(Image: Intel)

The Genuino 101 (Arduino 101 in the US) was introduced at the 2015 Rome Maker Faire.

(Image: Intel)

In recent years Intel has chosen the Rome Maker Faire as the place to introduce new products for the education, prototyping, and maker markets. This year marks the third in a row with a new product: The Genuino 101 (Arduino 101 in the US), an Arduino board built around a relatively new Intel processor.

While it's aimed primarily at the education and maker communities, there are plenty of commercial applications, such as experimenting with Internet of Things (IoT) projects, including wearables, diminutive gadgets, and sensors

At CES 2015, Intel introduced the Curie module, a low-power processor based on the Intel Quark SE system-on-a-chip that includes motion sensor, Bluetooth, and battery-charging features. Intel has now placed the Curie module on an Arduino, so providing a low-cost, simple-programming platform with genuine "Intel Inside" hardware.

[How will Arduino influence IoT? Read 6 Internet Of Things Building Blocks.]

Arduino 101 isn't the first time Intel has built a system for the Arduino ecosystem. The Intel Edison is a prototyping board designed to work with Arduino shields or other boards compatible with the Arduino dimensions and pin-outs. In addition, the Intel Galileo Gen 2 development board is software compatible with the Arduino IDE and is completely hardware-compatible with Arduino boards.

This new board rounds out a collection of development, education, and experimentation platforms that bring Intel into the Arduino universe. Arduino 101 will be on sale in the US in first quarter 2016 with a suggested retail price of $30.

Let's take a look at the new Arduino 101, its Intel siblings, and the way the three fit into a unified picture.

Then, in the comments section below, let's talk about how you would use each of the three boards. I've got my ideas (and boards on the way) and I'd love to hear what you are planning to do -- or have done -- with the Edison, Galileo, and Arduino 101.

Curtis Franklin Jr. is Senior Editor at Dark Reading. In this role he focuses on product and technology coverage for the publication. In addition he works on audio and video programming for Dark Reading and contributes to activities at Interop ITX, Black Hat, INsecurity, and ... View Full Bio

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haimroch
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haimroch,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/26/2015 | 5:29:28 AM
Hope Intel shall subsidize for its employees.
Price is quite high... but can certainly be considered as educetional tool.

There are many great ideas that when we need to build a POC for them we wish to have such a platform.. so why not bring it to whoever wishes for it in a really low proce - and get the "revenue" later when new product can emerge.

 
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
10/23/2015 | 7:31:04 AM
Re: Just 1 reason
Agreed...but the Pi 2 is a full system, meaning it comes with graphics, networking, and sound. Plus, it has a quad core processor and if I recall correctly more RAM. Then again, the Pi does not come with all the sensors on board. I bought the Pi 2 and might get more as it sufficiently replaces big PCs that are used for web browsing and video watching.
ANON12654843
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ANON12654843,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/21/2015 | 10:15:45 AM
Bring it on ..
Sounds great! - but a few questions I hope someone can answer:

1- How much memory on board

2- Will it be backward compatible with old arduino app code

3- Will any PC based IDE be provided with the package

4- Is the $30 price mentioned for the chip or is the breadboard included - if both, what is the chip alone?

j

 
Michelle
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Michelle,
User Rank: Ninja
10/20/2015 | 9:28:33 PM
Just 1 reason
I don't need 101 reasons to need an Intel Arduino! I need it and yet have no planned projects for it. I need it because I want it. I could use a Raspberry Pi too. Who doesn't need small form factor Linux-powered dev boards!?
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