Apple Watch Gets Email, IT Support - InformationWeek

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IoT
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Mobile // Mobile Devices
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6/29/2015
11:18 AM
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Apple Watch Gets Email, IT Support

Good Technology ported its enterprise email application to the Apple Watch so mobile professionals can manage their inboxes and IT can manage Apple's fledgling wearable.

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10 iPhone, Android Apps To Keep You Healthy
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Good Technology today announced the availability of Good Work for the Apple Watch. Good Work lets mobile professionals manage their inboxes while allowing IT to manage Apple's fledgling wearable.

Good Work is already available to the Apple iPhone, and the Watch version builds on that platform. In addition to basic email and calendar notifications, Good Work for Apple Watch adds capabilities such as glances for new and unread emails, and more detail about upcoming calendar appointments.

According to Good, Apple Watch owners can read emails directly on their watches, and delete, flag, or mark read/unread using the Watch's Force Touch gesture. Force Touch registers the amount of pressure applied to the screen, in addition to basic touch interactions. The calendar app now presents a scrollable timeline. Each appointment can be expanded to reveal information such as the organizer's photo, notes, and other details.

These improved user-facing features are joined by new security controls for IT. Good said in a statement that it updated the policy controls in the Good Dynamic Secure Mobility Platform, which lets businesses manage wearables used in the enterprise. IT can enable or disable the Good Work watch app from Good's Web-based console. Moreover, Good Work supports the new Apple Watch wrist-detection restriction, so companies that have stricter mobile device management policies can enforce those policies with ease.


(Image: Mutlu Kurtbas/iStockphoto)

(Image: Mutlu Kurtbas/iStockphoto)

"Enabling enterprise mobility means securing data accessed and used on all devices, whether smartphones, tablets, or wearables,” said Christy Wyatt, chairman and CEO of Good Technology, in a June 29 statement. "The Good Work app for Apple Watch [allows] greater productivity for employees while also providing complete policy controls for IT." (Wyatt was formerly an executive at Motorola.)

The proliferation of wearables in the enterprise is beginning to ramp up. Though the majority of wearables sold today are fitness bands, smartwatches are predicted to surpass fitness bands as early as 2017. Android Wear and Pebble have a solid share of the smartwatch market, though Apple may be quick to catch up.

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Reports suggest Apple has already moved 2.8 million smartwatches since the Watch's April 24 debut. Some analysts believe Apple may ship as many as 15 million devices before the end of the year. Every one of those Watches will be paired with an iPhone -- today's most prevalent enterprise smartphone.

IT will need to be on the lookout for the rising tide of wearables in the workplace -- especially those from Apple and Google. In addition to email and calendar data, the Watch holds enterprise contact information.

Good Work for Apple Watch is available from the iTunes App Store. If you're not employing Good's platform in your business, it's a safe bet that Good's competitors will add wearable controls to their own MDM platforms in the months ahead.

Eric is a freelance writer for InformationWeek specializing in mobile technologies. View Full Bio

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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
7/3/2015 | 10:05:36 AM
Re: Wow, still don't get it
To be fair, that's better than getting an allergic reaction or sustaining a chemical burn from the regular material.  ;)
PedroGonzales
50%
50%
PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
7/3/2015 | 9:56:37 AM
Re: Wow, still don't get it
I wouldn't want to read emails on an iwatch; the screen is tiny.  Unless, I tell recipients to start sending one line emails.  You can already set up the iwatch to receive your emails. I think for reading text messages is fine.  I agree with everyone that Apple is running out of ideas, after all these years of innovation, it is finally slowing down. But in tech if you slow down, others will catch up with you.
Technocrati
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50%
Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
7/2/2015 | 5:00:00 PM
Re: Wow, still don't get it
"....Lots of places are working on batteries, new ideas, but Apple would rather sell everyone a new Mac Book Pro, etc"


@jastroff     Well their strategy seems to be working - I am saving for a newer model as we speak.
jastroff
50%
50%
jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
7/2/2015 | 4:25:24 PM
Re: Wow, still don't get it
>> I would be much more impressed if Apple would figure out how to extend the battery life and reduce the heat expelled by my five year old Mac Book Pro.

I guess we should be thankful that the infustry standardized on power plugs. 

Lots of places are working on batteries, new ideas, but Apple would rather sell everyone a new Mac Book Pro, etc

 
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
7/2/2015 | 5:39:56 AM
Re: Wow, still don't get it
They probably could figure it out if they wanted to...but, you know, planned obsolescence and all...
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
7/2/2015 | 5:38:57 AM
Re: Wow, still don't get it
@vnewman2: Different skillsets, different "genres" of craftsmanship.

Perhaps someday the programming of today will seem quaint.

Of course, another big difference is that classic Swiss timepieces aren't made on an assembly line.
Technocrati
50%
50%
Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
7/2/2015 | 3:49:49 AM
Re: Wow, still don't get it

@progman2000   I just don't get this either - everyone has a phone that can do the same thing.  Is Apple running out of ideas or what ?

 

I would be much more impressed if Apple would figure out how to extend the battery life and reduce the heat expelled by my five year old Mac Book Pro.

Technocrati
50%
50%
Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
7/2/2015 | 3:44:39 AM
Re: Wow, still don't get it
@vnewman2  They sure did but it will never sway traditionalist.
Technocrati
50%
50%
Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
7/2/2015 | 3:42:03 AM
Re: No Gee Whiz Factor Here

@Joe  Your Dad was way ahead of the times - I did not know of this kind of technology in the 90's , but then again I was a poor college student during that time so I know I wasn't thinking about that kind of thing.

Technocrati
50%
50%
Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
7/2/2015 | 3:39:04 AM
Re: Wow, still don't get it
@Joe  Same here - the only computer I would like to see in that case would be on my Flat - screen.  And even that would be rare.
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