Apple Bans Nuclear Plants From Running 'Leopard' OS - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Mobile // Mobile Devices
Commentary
11/2/2007
02:14 PM
Paul McDougall
Paul McDougall
Commentary
50%
50%

Apple Bans Nuclear Plants From Running 'Leopard' OS

While researching a story about Apple letting users run Leopard in a virtualized environment, I came across some interesting language in the software's license agreement. Who knew you can't use Leopard to run a nuclear power plant, or a 747?

While researching a story about Apple letting users run Leopard in a virtualized environment, I came across some interesting language in the software's license agreement. Who knew you can't use Leopard to run a nuclear power plant, or a 747?The end user license agreement for the server version of Leopard, aka OS X 10.5, contains this list of restrictions.

Leopard is "not intended for use in the operation of nuclear facilities, aircraft navigation or communication systems, air traffic control systems, life support machines or other equipment in which the failure of the Apple software could lead to death, personal injury or severe physical or environmental damage."

Apple is concerned about environmental damage? Didn't Greenpeace just discover that the iPhone is loaded with nasty chemicals?

Anyhow, it seems Apple CEO Steve Jobs just doesn't want the liability that might arise if Leopard were to be installed in, say, the radar system that tracks planes going in and out of JFK airport.

I'm not sure if the EULAs for previous versions of the Mac OS contain these restrictions, but I'm sure the blogosphere will let me know.

By imposing these limits, is Jobs just doing his, uh, job and protecting Apple shareholders from lawsuits filed by the victims of, say, a meltdown at a nuclear plant that was running Macs?

Or is he wimping out?

I mean, what if Microsoft and all the Linux and Unix vendors imposed the same restrictions. On what software would the nation's critical infrastructure run -- BeOS?

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
InformationWeek Is Getting an Upgrade!

Find out more about our plans to improve the look, functionality, and performance of the InformationWeek site in the coming months.

Slideshows
Blockchain Gets Real Across Industries
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  7/22/2021
Commentary
Seeking a Competitive Edge vs. Chasing Savings in the Cloud
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  7/19/2021
News
How CIO Roles Will Change: The Future of Work
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  7/1/2021
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Monitoring Critical Cloud Workloads Report
In this report, our experts will discuss how to advance your ability to monitor critical workloads as they move about the various cloud platforms in your company.
Slideshows
Flash Poll