Apple WWDC 2015: 10 Best Moments From The Show - InformationWeek

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Mobile // Mobile Applications
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6/9/2015
07:03 AM
Eric Zeman
Eric Zeman
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Apple WWDC 2015: 10 Best Moments From The Show

InformationWeek was on hand at Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference 2015 in San Francisco Monday to hear all about about OS X, iOS 9, and watchOS. Here are our 10 favorite moments from the conference.
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(Image: Eric Zeman)

(Image: Eric Zeman)

Apple executives took the stage at the company's Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) in San Francisco Monday to talk about what's in store for its three main platforms: OS X, iOS 9, and watchOS. Much of the news was predicted well ahead of the WWDC 2015 keynote, but that didn't diminish the excitement InformationWeek witnessed among developers attending the event.

Attendees were especially enthused about Apple's Swift development language, which the company is going to make open source later this summer.

Apple CEO Tim Cook kicked off the event without the company's traditional snapshot of its sales and other data points. As far as the state of Apple is concerned, all Cook had to say was, "Everything is going great!"

Craig Federighi, Apple's SVP of software engineering, followed Cook on stage and dove straight into OS X. Mac OS 10.11 is called El Capitan, after the massive rock face within Yosemite National Park. Apple decided to keep the feature list for El Capitan to a minimum. The desktop operating system adds improvements to email, notes, Safari, and Mission Control. It gains the ability to use a split-screen mode and adds Apple's Metal developer toolset to the desktop. Apple said Metal boosts the performance of OS X significantly. It will be available in beta form in July and made widely available to users for free in the fall.

Next up, Federighi discussed iOS 9. The company focused on improving the performance of iOS 9 by adding several key features, but shied away from cramming the platform with hundreds of new powers.

The biggest change is to Siri, with its new "Proactive" mode. Siri will be able to handle a wide range of natural language requests -- including those that require access to third-party apps -- much like Google Now on Android devices and Cortana on Windows Phones. A new API makes Siri much better than it was at searching third-party apps, thanks to deep linking. Siri will be able to check traffic, schedules, and other details, and make suggestions throughout the day as users go about their business.

Other improvements to iOS 9 include expanded Apple Pay powers and availability; Apple Notes and iCloud syncing; public transportation in Apple Maps; and a new app called News for offering curated magazine content. The iPad gets split-screen multitasking and a new keyboard.

WatchOS 2.0 got a lot of time on the stage. The platform has some huge additions, especially concerning native apps. With watchOS 2.0, developers will be able to run apps entirely on the Watch without an iPhone. Further, they'll be able to tap into WiFi for data connections. Apple is adding a ton of new APIs, so developers can turbo-charge their apps.

Last, Apple announced Apple Music, its long-rumored subscription music service. The monthly service, which will cost $10 per month, launches June 30 and purports to be a great way for people to listen to music on the iPhone, iPad, iPod, Mac, and Apple TV.

Here are our 10 favorite moments from the show floor at Apple's WWDC 2015.

Eric is a freelance writer for InformationWeek specializing in mobile technologies. View Full Bio

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Pnyxor
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Pnyxor,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/11/2015 | 6:42:07 PM
These announcements about Apple's OS are considered innovations?

I am CONTINUOUSLY amazed at Apple's marketing success! As a Windows user and developer, when I read what Apple touts as "wonderful new innovations", I am shocked that the reviewer seems to be so ignorant of what Windows developers have had available to them and, if they are competent, have been using for so many years! 'Mission Control will make it more fun to switch between apps', well, duh! 'Apps side by side' and 'split screen', yikes, this is considered to be new? 'Siri links to your schedule', huh, new? iOS9 'will give walking times from transit stations'; hasn't the reviewer used Google Maps once in the last dozen years? And the rest of the "innovations" are about Apple using Apple's new financial tie-ins to make even more money from the gullible Apple devotees. And don't users realize that Apple takes 30% of app developer revenues? 30% - that's downright highway robbery!

How much longer can marketing hype prop up a company that sells mediocre-quality hardware at wildly inflated prices? Compare the "wonderful" Mac Pro at $4,999 (with an incredibly limited number of options, no expansion capability, no upgrade path and, of course, only ONE supplier) to a wide selection of Windows hardware, with infinite expandability and from multiple suppliers, priced between $1,800 and $3,000. Spend $5,000 on a Windows computer and you will have something that will make the Mac Pro look like what it is: an expensive child's toy.

All that Apple has going for it is that their products are pretty and cute. Hasn't anybody noticed that the company has quit their marketing hype that Apple computers were somehow magically immune from viruses? Recent statistics show that virus developers have realized that the 94% of computers that are using Windows have become progressively more difficult to attack, and that the 5% of computers running Apple OS have been wide open all along; most viruses are now attacking those 5% using Apple's OS!

And when the CEO of a company's summary of their financial state is "Everything is going great!" without providing any details, I immediately start divesting my portfolio of those shares. It is abundantly obvious that things are not so great when the CEO is merely falling back onto hype in his presentations (yet again) ...

kevinmn
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kevinmn,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/10/2015 | 11:21:03 PM
iOS 9
Nice move by Apple. In iOS9 Apple has done some great changes and improvements. Now I am very curious to see the fight between iOS9 beat Android 6.
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
6/10/2015 | 2:38:35 AM
Re: Just trust us
WatchOS 2.0 looks like an improvement. The watch is not so tied up to the iPhone now. Perhaps it can attract a few more customers.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
6/9/2015 | 6:42:21 PM
Just trust us
When everything is really going great, Apple trumpets the numbers. I can only conclude that Watch sales were not impressive enough to celebrate.
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