Microsoft Attempts To Explain Its Windows Mobile Naming Conventions - InformationWeek

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Commentary
3/22/2007
03:06 PM
Eric Ogren
Eric Ogren
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Microsoft Attempts To Explain Its Windows Mobile Naming Conventions

When Microsoft launched Windows Mobile 6 back in February, it also renamed the different versions of the software. Now, rather than actually describing what specific device they're for, the names are vague and confusing: Standard, Professional, and Classic. Find out why.

When Microsoft launched Windows Mobile 6 back in February, it also renamed the different versions of the software. Now, rather than actually describing what specific device they're for, the names are vague and confusing: Standard, Professional, and Classic. Find out why.Apparently the whole thing sprung from the fact that no one knows what a smartphone really is. (Is this a difficult concept to grasp?)

Ed Hardy over at Brighthand recently dug up a blog entry from Windows Mobile Team developer Mike Calligaro. In it, Calligaro attempts to explain why the different Microsoft Windows Mobile 6 products' names were changed. You can read the whole exchange here. The end result is this:

* "Windows Mobile Professional" is for the touchscreen devices (i.e., Palm Treo 750); * "Windows Mobile Standard" is for non-touchscreen models (i.e., HTC 3125); * "Windows Mobile Classic" is for traditional handhelds with touchscreens but lacking cellular-wireless capabilities (i.e., Dell Axim).

Rather than be descriptive about what type of device the versions are compatible with, though, the new names feel more like selections you'd make based on your income or work status.

Does anyone every choose to use software or hardware deemed "classic" (i.e., old, for fuddy-duddies, no longer hip)?

My grandfather's '57 Chevy is classic. "Stairway to Heaven" is a classic. While it's totally cool to cruise in a classic '57 Chevy listening to classic rock, I am not sure how many people are going to try out "classic" software. Is this Microsoft's way of saying, "Put that hardware to pasture and upgrade"?

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