iPhone Round Up: 2.0.1 Firmware Problems And The $1000 App - InformationWeek

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8/6/2008
09:53 AM
Eric Ogren
Eric Ogren
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iPhone Round Up: 2.0.1 Firmware Problems And The $1000 App

Seems Apple's "bug fixes" have created some new bugs. Users who've updated to iPhone firmware 2.0.1 are reporting various new troubles. Then there's the story of the application for the iPhone that costs $1,000 and does absolutely nothing.

Seems Apple's "bug fixes" have created some new bugs. Users who've updated to iPhone firmware 2.0.1 are reporting various new troubles. Then there's the story of the application for the iPhone that costs $1,000 and does absolutely nothing.Almost as fast as hackers come up with a way to unlock and pwn the iPhone, Apple comes up with a new way to squash the hack. Among one of the issues being reported by iPhone users who've updated to firmware 2.0.1 is that the Pwnage tool appears to have been broken by the update. This means that if you update, the phone will be re-locked and can't be unlocked by the existing tool. If you want to keep your buggy iPhone 2.0 unlocked and free of Apple's and AT&T's clutches, then don't update for now.

Another problem appears to be affecting those on the Vodafone network. If you update the iPhone with the iPhone set to "airplane mode" (which disables all the radios), you could be in for a rough ride. The Boy Genuis reports, "Some users that paid the requisite fee to have their Vodafone-branded handset unlocked for international roaming are finding that the 2.0.1 update is frying the unlock, rendering their phone useless without a Vodafone SIM. Some people have had luck with a full restore, but more than a few seem to be completely out of luck." Vodafone is suggesting that users affected by this issue reinstall iTunes and then put the iPhone into recovery / restore mode.

Now, about that application. Some guy by the name of Armin Heinrich developed an application called "I Am Rich". The app, available from the iPhone Apps Store, costs a whopping $999.99, the maximum allowable price for an application. What does this app do? All it does is display a rotating ruby on the iPhone's screen. In other words, it does nothing, zilch, nada. Maybe he should have called the app "I Am Stupid" instead, which is surely an apt moniker for anyone who downloads the do-nothing waste of code.

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