Apple's iPhone SDK A Step In The Right Direction - InformationWeek

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10/18/2007
12:26 AM
Fredric Paul
Fredric Paul
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Apple's iPhone SDK A Step In The Right Direction

Well, I'd like to think Steve Jobs was listening to me when he announced today that Apple will introduce a fully sanctioned iPhone software development kit (SDK) in February, 2008. But he probably saw the light all on his own.

Well, I'd like to think Steve Jobs was listening to me when he announced today that Apple will introduce a fully sanctioned iPhone software development kit (SDK) in February, 2008. But he probably saw the light all on his own.Earlier this week, I wrote a bMighty feature about Apple's Epic Internal Battle Between Good and Evil, wondering why Apple didn't seem to trust the people who use and love its products.

Well, today Apple took steps to squash one such concern by announcing the come February it will allow -- and support -- third-party application development on the iPhone and the iTouch iPod (an iPhone without the phone). The SDK will no doubt quickly lead to the availability of all manner of "legitimate" new apps for the popular machines.

Tom Krazit at News.comsays the move turns the iPhone into a real computer, while Thomas Claburn at InformationWeek says the SDK will be a big step toward security by ending the need to hack an iPhone exploit just to make it do some of the cool things it's capable of. And presumably ending the possiblity that Apple will "brick" (gosh, I love that verb) your fancy new phone if you try make it do your bidding.

In related good news from Apple, the company is dropping the price of the non-copy protected music offered on iTunes to the same $.99 per song it charges for copy-protected tracks. I'm not sure why anyone would be the DRM versions, and the move is no doubt a response to Amazon selling non-crippled 256Kbps MP3s for $.99, but it's still another step toward the light.

A cynic might ask what too Apple so long make these moves. But I'm just going to say: "well done" and keep these tend coming.

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