8 Hot Wearable Devices To Get You Healthy In 2016 - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Mobile
News
12/14/2015
07:06 AM
Dawn Kawamoto
Dawn Kawamoto
Slideshows
50%
50%

8 Hot Wearable Devices To Get You Healthy In 2016

Now that the Thanksgiving food coma has faded, the winter holidays, along with the associated parties and feasts, are upon us. That makes the task of staying fit and healthy a bit daunting. But there is some high-tech help available. Here are eight wearables designed to help you jump-start your New Year's resolution.
Previous
1 of 9
Next

(Image: Fitbit)

(Image: Fitbit)

With the winter holidays in full swing and tables laden with lots of rich and fatty foods, along with calorie-packed wines and champagnes, we're afraid to think about the fallout from all the feasting.

Donning a wearable that's geared toward health and fitness might seem attractive. Apparently, an increasing number of people have the same idea.

The wearables industry is expected to grow 27% to 170 million units worldwide this year, over the previous year. Revenue is also set to spike 70% to $20 billion, according to Shane Walker, principal analyst of digital health and wearable technologies at research firm IHS.

Health and fitness wearables are predicted to account for 28% of the industry's $20 billion in sales this year, Walker said. Between 2012 to 2019 the compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) for health and fitness wearables revenue is expected to increase 25%, he added.

The health and fitness wearables industry got its start in 1982, when Polar introduced the first wireless wearable heart rate monitor called the Sport Tester PE2000.

The growth in this segment of wearables is being driven by an increased interest in fitness, combined with greater use of Bluetooth and ANT+ technologies on smartphones. Users can now glean useful information about their workouts, compare that information with archived data, review how many calories they burned, and keep track of their cardio performance.

[See 10 iPhone Healthcare, Fitness Apps That Actually Work.]

"This is how people use it now. There is a wealth of information on your activity," Walker said. He added that future demand of health and fitness wearables and the ways these devices are used will likely be shaped as smartwatches increasingly become the product type of this segment of the wearables industry.

Here's a look at eight health and fitness wearables that may provide the wealth of data Walker referred to. Take a look and let us know what you think of these in the comments section. Would you use any of these to help you reach your health and fitness goals? If not, what wearables would you recommend?

**New deadline of Dec. 18, 2015** Be a part of the prestigious InformationWeek Elite 100! Time is running out to submit your company's application by Dec. 18, 2015. Go to our 2016 registration page: InformationWeek's Elite 100 list for 2016.

Dawn Kawamoto is an Associate Editor for Dark Reading, where she covers cybersecurity news and trends. She is an award-winning journalist who has written and edited technology, management, leadership, career, finance, and innovation stories for such publications as CNET's ... View Full Bio

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Previous
1 of 9
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Gigi3
100%
0%
Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
12/14/2015 | 11:31:16 PM
Wearable ring from Oura
"Oura developed a wellness ring that tracks and analyzes a user's rest and sleep. One of the differentiating features of the Oura ring, according to Wearable Technologies, is that the device does not need to transmit the data back to a mobile phone continually, but rather shares the data once it is within range of the smartphone."

Dawn, I feel this is quite good, simple and multifunctional. The need for all time connectivity can be minimized and hence data usage too.
Slideshows
What Digital Transformation Is (And Isn't)
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  12/4/2019
Commentary
Watch Out for New Barriers to Faster Software Development
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  12/3/2019
Commentary
If DevOps Is So Awesome, Why Is Your Initiative Failing?
Guest Commentary, Guest Commentary,  12/2/2019
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
State of the Cloud
State of the Cloud
Cloud has drastically changed how IT organizations consume and deploy services in the digital age. This research report will delve into public, private and hybrid cloud adoption trends, with a special focus on infrastructure as a service and its role in the enterprise. Find out the challenges organizations are experiencing, and the technologies and strategies they are using to manage and mitigate those challenges today.
Video
Current Issue
Getting Started With Emerging Technologies
Looking to help your enterprise IT team ease the stress of putting new/emerging technologies such as AI, machine learning and IoT to work for their organizations? There are a few ways to get off on the right foot. In this report we share some expert advice on how to approach some of these seemingly daunting tech challenges.
Slideshows
Flash Poll