5 Things The iPhone 3GS Is Still Missing - InformationWeek

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Commentary
6/9/2009
02:35 PM
Eric Ogren
Eric Ogren
Commentary
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5 Things The iPhone 3GS Is Still Missing

The iPhone 3GS brings some much-needed improvements to Apple's mobile computing device, but still manages to leave out some key technologies and features. Here are five that I could think of off the top of my head.

The iPhone 3GS brings some much-needed improvements to Apple's mobile computing device, but still manages to leave out some key technologies and features. Here are five that I could think of off the top of my head.I admit it. I am nitpicking here. But some of this stuff needs to be pointed out.

Where is Flash?

Apple has had years to work this out. Last we heard from Apple, the full version of Adobe's Flash is just too much for the iPhone to handle, and Flash Lite doesn't go far enough. That's no longer a satisfactory stance.

Adobe has made it clear that it is willing to work with Apple to bring Flash to the iPhone. What's the hold up? No excuses, Apple. Figure it out and actually push some boundaries.

Where Is An Industry-Standard USB Port?

The iPhone 3GS is nearly identical to the iPhone 3G with respect to the size and shape. One of the specs that has remained unchanged is Apple's use of a proprietary USB connector rather than what is quickly becoming the standard USB port for mobile phones: microUSB.

By sticking to this proprietary connector, Apple can continue to bring in additional revenue by selling the necessary cables to those who lose them. Apple's cables are more costly than any regular USB cable that can be picked up at RadioShack.

Removable Battery Is Where, Again?

Apple has not changed the design of the iPhone to give users the ability to swap out replacement batteries should their battery die before the end of the day. Nearly every other phone allows users to do this.

Instead, Apple has left users to seek out solutions from third-party vendors such as Mophie, which sells a battery pack for the iPhone at the cost of $80.

User-Accessible File System

iPhone users still don't have access to a basic file system on the iPhone. Apple has chosen to leave its menu and file structure inaccessible to the end user.

Smartphones running Windows Mobile, BlackBerry OS, Symbian S60 and others let end users access and move their files at will. Why doesn't Apple think users can handle this?

Sure, the iDisk application allows users to see and share the files that are stored in their MobileMe account, but they aren't local to the iPhone and MobileMe requires a yearly subscription.

User-Configurable Equalizer

I realize not everyone is a certified (or certifiable) audiophile such as myself, but c'mon. Give me a 5-band or 7-band EQ that I can adjust to make my music sound the way I want it to. Basic, entry-level music phones can do this. The full, desktop version of iTunes has a user-adjustable EQ. Why doesn't the iPhone?

What about you? Anything you want to see in the iPhone 3GS that Apple left out?

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