Microsoft And RSA Security Team For Windows Lock - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Software // Enterprise Applications

Microsoft And RSA Security Team For Windows Lock

The token system would give PCs and servers running the latest versions of Windows additional protection against intruders.

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Office computers running the latest Windows operating systems could get a new degree of protection against snoops and intruders from a partnership announced Tuesday by Microsoft Corp. and RSA Security Inc.

Instead of only making users type in passwords to log on to a computer, users of the RSA "token" system also enter a random number that appears on their so-called SecureID, a key-chain fob or plastic card they carry with them.

The number changes every minute, generated by an algorithm that also resides on a server inside a company's computing center.

The new agreement, announced at RSA's annual security conference in San Francisco, would protect Windows-based computers with the token scheme, whether they are portable or attached to a corporate network.

Currently, signing onto Windows requires no more than typing a user name and password.

RSA's chief executive, Art Coviello, said the system offers a smart alternative because intruders can currently, with relative ease, steal or figure out passwords.

Also, the companies noted that because the RSA system logs each attempt someone makes to use a computer or a corporate network, it can help companies comply with new government regulations surrounding the privacy of health-care records and other personal data.

Bedford, Mass.-based RSA, which says it serves 14,000 companies, said it expects the Windows-locking tokens to become available in the third quarter.

The tokens would work only on personal computers running Windows 2000 or Windows XP or on servers running Windows Server 2003.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Slideshows
What Digital Transformation Is (And Isn't)
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  12/4/2019
Commentary
Watch Out for New Barriers to Faster Software Development
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  12/3/2019
Commentary
If DevOps Is So Awesome, Why Is Your Initiative Failing?
Guest Commentary, Guest Commentary,  12/2/2019
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Getting Started With Emerging Technologies
Looking to help your enterprise IT team ease the stress of putting new/emerging technologies such as AI, machine learning and IoT to work for their organizations? There are a few ways to get off on the right foot. In this report we share some expert advice on how to approach some of these seemingly daunting tech challenges.
Slideshows
Flash Poll