Windows 8.1 Timing All Wrong - InformationWeek

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Windows 8.1 Timing All Wrong
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CopyingAppleIsDangerous
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CopyingAppleIsDangerous,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/25/2013 | 5:35:59 PM
re: Windows 8.1 Timing All Wrong
Not to mention that it is very offensive for Microsoft to keep saying...

"But you have a choice!"

...while 10's of millions of users are looking at theirs Windows 8 screen and asking themselves...

"Does Microsoft think that we are that stupid? I wish they would stop saying what is clearly not true."

It's insulting.
redwards077
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redwards077,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/25/2013 | 1:11:28 PM
re: Windows 8.1 Timing All Wrong
Excellent analysis on the timing of Microsoft's release schedule. What the article doesn't mention is the fact that Microsoft has never really cared about their hardware vendors. They make an operating system that's had the largest market share and they know vendors will put it on the machines they sell because there is no acceptable alternative. This is true even though versions of Linux have been around for years. Sure, they catch a niche market but they have never been a serious threat to Windows, even in the dark days of Vista. The only real threat to Windows has been Windows. Customers have chosen to keep XP rather than upgrade to Vista, and now to keep Windows 7 rather than move to Windows 8, but that changes when the support for the older OS runs out. Anyone who tells you that Microsoft cares about their hardware vendors needs to be reminded that those vendors found out Microsoft entered the tablet market with Surface at the same exact moment the general public did. That showed the vendors how little regrade Microsoft has for them.

Microsoft will only adjust their release schedule when it becomes advantageous for themselves. The reason for that may very well be to get more back-to-school sales for Surface.
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/25/2013 | 11:51:18 AM
re: Windows 8.1 Timing All Wrong
Can't state it any better. It is a big usability issue and especially Metro goes against all the UX guidelines Microsoft crafted the past decade. Yes, Microsoft is so arrogant that they ignore their own advice.
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/25/2013 | 11:49:07 AM
re: Windows 8.1 Timing All Wrong
Agree! And I should read comments before posting my own...didn't want to plagiarize.
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/25/2013 | 11:47:36 AM
re: Windows 8.1 Timing All Wrong
Sales are down, usage share is dismal, the stats are worse than for Vista, the dozens of blog and forum posts rip Win8, and businesses buying Win8 licenses instantly replace it with Win7. Sure, the millions of Microsoft customers banded together to feed the media lies.
When you deploy Win8, can these users make an educated choice between Win8 and something else? Or is it that you push Win8 and that's it. In that case they surely 'take to it' because there isn't any other option. You should give them at least two systems, one with Win7 and one with Win8 and hand them a set of tasks to perform. Then let them add their own tasks that they need to accomplish. Time task completion and get obviously subjective feedback. Have them alternate which OS they use first and have the tasks be limited to apps that come with each OS, such as copying files, adding a mailbox account, personalizing the desktop, etc. They will succeed on either system, but it will take longer on Win8 because there are just more clicks and interactions for everything. Win8 is a productivity killer, even worse than the ribbon is.
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/25/2013 | 11:39:30 AM
re: Windows 8.1 Timing All Wrong
What Microsoft should do is have major refreshes in spring and a major release in the fall every year. They should just continuously deliver what they got and not have folks wait three or four years for something new. That way Microsoft can try something for six months, get feedback, listen to feedback (yep, that will be a radically new concept for Microsoft!), and then fix or replace or drop features. Microsoft needs to be more agile and deliver what customers want. Customers do not want Metro, they do not want charms, and they do not want stuff to be renamend and rearranged for no reason.
Palpatine
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Palpatine,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/24/2013 | 6:50:20 AM
re: Windows 8.1 Timing All Wrong
It seems you do not know how w8 works.
You have not the choice to skip Metro UI.
You cannot uninstall it, live with its burden of bloat in terms of space and code with potential vulnerabilities: it is installed and you cannot get rid of it.

You cannot disable it.
You cannot start in desktop, for this you must use third party products that MS can in any moment snuff, as they already did for straight to desktop tricks enabled in the betas: MS do not provide you a choice and systematically snuffed the way to do so, and can continue snuff in updates the way you actually rely on.
You cannot avoid to jump to Metro world each time a Metro apps start, good luck in finding them and changing them to desktop apps.
You cannot access to controls MS decided to move to Metro, if you don't want to deal with Metro.

MS spent thousands developers/years work to NOT let you choice of skipping metro, and if you don't understand it you are deluding yourself, or working for MS marketing (which is quite similar nowadays).

EDIT: and don't forget to buy the new wonderful MS mices that integrates a button for getting you straight to Metro!
Palpatine
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Palpatine,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/24/2013 | 6:42:36 AM
re: Windows 8.1 Timing All Wrong
The real w8 problem is that "It can do things none of its competitors can do." is not true in its crumbling stronghold, the desktop.

Desktop PC market is dying because here the "new way" offers a worse experience for most users than W7, so sales dropped a dramatic 25%.

Desktop users does not want to waste screen space.

Desktop users does not want to be schizophrenically switched to a mono task mono window mono focus world every time they start the PC, or need to launch a program, or click on a file associated wit a cr4ppy Metro app.

Desktop users does not want to be told their multi windows, free distribution software world is the past and the future is a single focus, dictatorial single Store distribution "you would better register" app centric world.

Desktop users does not want to pay hundreds of dollars more for a 30"touchscreen to work in the least ergonomic way ever conceived.

Desktop users perceives W8 as an huge step back in terms of usability and freedom.

W8 is definitely not offering a "It can do things none of its competitors can do." experience to the largest MS users market, and if MS thinks tablets did not changed the game and people will not flee from W8 PC platform in flocks (as they are already doing), they are deluding themselves, and are showing us they want to copy a wave they don't really understand.
As you correctly say, people are using PC less, that is the first and foremost MS problem: they are boosting non windows tablet usage alienating the bulk of PC users from their next generation system.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
5/23/2013 | 9:10:35 PM
re: Windows 8.1 Timing All Wrong
Sure, the media has had influence on Windows 8's woes. But it's not
like journalists forced high-ranking executives from Microsoft's OEM
partners to publicly express their doubts. Journalists also didn't force
those same OEMs to establish prohibitive prices last winter.

To be clear: Windows 8
offers unique and legitimate benefits. It can do things none of its competitors can do. But to get some of those
benefits, you've had to shell out $1000 for a tablet with lousy battery
life. Is your contention that factors like high prices and trash-talking CEOs - never mind the UI itself - really haven't affected
Win8's path?

For what it's worth, Windows 8 articles of any sort
are usually met with divisive user comments-- even on websites that
cater to targeted professionals, as opposed to general consumers. If an
article criticizes the Start Screen, you can be sure a few people will
pop up to explain why the Modern UI is still better than the old Start
Menu. If an article details a successful Windows 8 deployment,
meanwhile, you can expect some commenters to describe, with great
passion and precision, why they don't like the new interface. Some of
this is fanboy trolling, but when I look at the most specific and
detailed complaints, I don't get the sense that they're coming from
people who've been swayed by the media; rather, I get the sense they're coming from people with hands-on hands-on experience. This dichotomy doesn't discount Win8's merits, but it suggests the OS's flaws are real too.
AustinIT
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AustinIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/23/2013 | 7:25:21 PM
re: Windows 8.1 Timing All Wrong
The irony here (for you) is that you DO have a choice in which UI you want to work with. It seems to me that you don't actually use the product. Instead you just post your "thoughts" based on what you read or hear from someone else. Do a bit of critical thinking on your own for a change.
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