Dropbox Urges Users To Change Old Passwords - InformationWeek

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Dropbox Urges Users To Change Old Passwords
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Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
8/31/2016 | 8:11:31 AM
Re: Time
I wonder if changing the password to whatever day it was plus a number worked for her. -Susan
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
8/31/2016 | 8:05:04 AM
Re: Time
I think I was one of those early adopters, Technorati. :) I just don't remember when was that I signed up for the account. That long it has been. -Susan
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
8/31/2016 | 8:02:32 AM
Re: Time
Password re-use is sometimes innevitable. If you have, say, tens of accounts it's really hard to always remember every single individual password. Bio-passwords should be more common. As for Dropbox, I signed up for an account years ago. I used it for a long time. Then I stopped. I remembered about it not long ago, I think thanks to an email Dropbox sent me. -Susan
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2016 | 3:37:11 AM
Re: Time
Good point Michelle when I first read the fours years part I was alarmed but I had forgotten about early adopters which I am not.
Michelle
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Michelle,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2016 | 11:46:33 PM
Re: Time
4 years might be a long time, but I'm sure there are folks who signed up for the service and never used it. Those folks may be avid password re-users (sounds like an addiction). I recently changed a bunch of passwords and noticed I hadn't used some accounts for ----- years. 
Michelle
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Michelle,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2016 | 11:43:48 PM
Re: Changed, not changed
@Joe that's an interesting strategy I haven't heard before. Associating scary termination language with password re-use seems like it could curb the practice (at least a little).
Michelle
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Michelle,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2016 | 11:40:06 PM
Re: Changed, not changed
I think many have tried and failed using multiple means. I don't know how to change attitudes toward password re-use. Password fatigue is probably a real thing that people deal with everyday, they feel undue burden to make unique passwords for every site/service.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
8/30/2016 | 10:40:38 PM
Re: Changed, not changed
@Michelle: The expert advice I've heard occasionally -- and I adopt myself -- is for companies to have in their employment agreements a passage that states that the password belongs to the company, and anyone who gets caught using a company password on another system will be fired immediately.

Realistically speaking, it's a practically unenforceable line item -- but it sure gets people thinking about things.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
8/30/2016 | 10:38:38 PM
Time
Four years is probably a pretty long time to go without changing your password.

Of course, at the opposite end off the spectrum are overly oppressive IT departments.  One woman I know used to just use whatever day of the week it was plus a number or something whenever IT would do its all-too-often rounds of "CHANGE YOUR PASSWORD NOW BECAUSE WE SAY SO."
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
8/30/2016 | 10:37:32 PM
Re: Changed, not changed
@Whoopty: It's just life, I guess.  It sounds crazy to us, but it's real, regular, everyday life.

True story: I got a picture from a loved one via text message yesterday -- a picture of a sticky note on their co-worker's monitor.

The sticky note said: "Username: [firsrt initial + last name]" followed by "Password: Password123."

Once one gets past the obvious head-shaking wonder of that, the greatest and most absurd part of that, to me, is that this person felt the need to write "Password:" before what their password was -- as if writing "Password123" by itself without any additional context might confuse them.
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