Ransomware Hit Nearly 50% Of Businesses In 2015: Study - InformationWeek

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Ransomware Hit Nearly 50% Of Businesses In 2015: Study
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tjgkg
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tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
8/9/2016 | 11:20:10 AM
Re: US cyber education
The phising emails have gotten a lot better. They have cut down on the spelling errors and have improved their grammar. Still I am careful whenever something unusual comes into an inbox.  There is usually something that will give it away.
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
8/4/2016 | 7:06:45 PM
Re: US cyber education
@Joe!  Wow!  I LOVE that guy.  Sometimes you need to draw a line in the sand.  Well done, I say.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
8/4/2016 | 6:03:11 PM
Re: US cyber education
@vnewman: One InfoSec guy I interviewed earlier this year told me (and it wasn't the first time I'd heard this tip; I've used/advised it myself with consulting clients, but this was an especially notable guy, so it made me feel especially pleased and vindicated) that what he does at his company is have as part of the employment agreement, "You agree to not use any of your company passwords for anything else.  If you do, and we find out, you're fired."

He went on to note that no one has ever been fired for that policy and that, realistically, probably no one ever would and that the policy is almost completely unenforceable, but just having that language in there compels people to think about it more and have it top of mind -- so they don't engage in that behavior.
Joe Stanganelli
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50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
8/4/2016 | 6:00:09 PM
Re: US cyber education
@Whoopty: I see it as a casualty of our sociocultural environment right now.

On the primary/secondary side, all the bickering is over testing, hard academics, arts, and especially Common Core.

Meanwhile, we are still (unfortunately) at a point where most people think that "the only way to get a good job" is to go (heavily in debt to go) to college -- and the most expensive one, at that.

Meanwhile, nobody's focusing on what the world needs, what society needs, what our country needs.

Oh, well.  That's none of my business.
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
8/4/2016 | 1:20:24 PM
Re: US cyber education
This is what we tell our folks on what they can do to prevent Cyberattacks:

Do not email company information to personal email addresses, such as Gmail, Yahoo, etc.

Hover over links before clicking to validate they point to the appropriate website. 

Do not use your corporate password for other external accounts or services. 

Do not insert a USB drive that you are not certain of the source or contents.

Do not open email attachments or click on links contained in emails that you do not expect or where you do not recognize the sender.  If something seems "off" - trust your gut and ask someone in IT before clicking.

vnewman2
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50%
vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
8/4/2016 | 1:11:09 PM
Re: US cyber education
Here are a few more fun facts on ransomware:

FBI intelligence suggests that over 75% of all cyber attacks start with phishing emails...

FBI estimates that Ransomware is on pace to be a one billion dollar business in 2016.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
8/4/2016 | 7:52:47 AM
Re: US cyber education
It really is surprising, that such a technologically advanced nation could have such poor security education systems in place is a real shame. The fact that the two potential presidential candidates are so technologically illiterate too, is not going to help come November. 

General education in the work place is probably the best way to combat these ransomware threats though. Making sure people don't click nefarious links or open dodgy attachments is a great step to avoiding much of the problems.
Joe Stanganelli
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50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
8/3/2016 | 5:28:01 PM
US cyber education
Exacerbating the issue is that the US, unlike other countries, places far too little (if any, ever) importance on cybereducation, coding, and cybersecurity.

Other nations teach cybersecurity at the secondary-education level -- which is precisely what we should do here.  Instead, we're lucky if a high school has a computer club for a few enthusiasts.

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