Toyota Aims For AI Car Features By 2021 - InformationWeek

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Toyota Aims For AI Car Features By 2021
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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
6/24/2016 | 11:20:43 AM
Re: The future of AI in cars
@SaneIT: Indeed, I definitely understand and appreciate how this technology can be applied in commercial and industrial settings.

For personal use, the safety features are great, but anything beyond that I think will (and ought to) come down to personal preference.

As for me, I don't even like backseat drivers -- let alone my own car telling me how to drive!  ;)
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/24/2016 | 8:08:23 AM
Re: The future of AI in cars
I understood the large trucking automation.  Most of the products we touch every day have spent some time traveling this way and I think it's a great area to address with automation.  Driving a large truck day in day out is not easy on a human body or mind, there is a lot going on and a lot to process very quickly, more so than driving your car down the road.  Even if we never fully automate the driving but greatly assist the drivers to reduce the hunting for data to process by removing blind spots, improving navigation, assisting with the actual driving for example.  Once those systems are working they can be scaled down to mini buses or mini trucks.  Imagine not having to drive a large truck into a large city.  A large trucking hub could exist on the edge of a large city then smaller autonomous vehicles could move smaller shipments into the city.  The same could address public transportation, airplanes, trains and large buses bring people into cities and smaller transportation options shuttle them around with shorter more frequent routes. 
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
6/23/2016 | 9:34:02 AM
Re: The future of AI in cars
SaneIT, 

That's a smart idea that should be difficult to put into practice. Those vehicles you envision could be used as public transport, and maybe by companies, something like an autonomous school bus. What I tried to say by showing you the trucks is that if they have thought about solutions to make logistics easier, saving time and money, in the same way  they could find similar solutions to replace the painful city buses like the ones you describe.

Your smaller vehicles idea should reach those who can make the change. :) 

-Susan
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/23/2016 | 8:12:53 AM
Re: The future of AI in cars
When I talk about smart public transportation it becomes smaller vehicles, fewer passengers per vehicle and fewer stops per vehicle.  I think one of the biggest problems with bus lines is that for me to replace my 30-minute drive by taking buses it would take me 3 hours to get to work.  If there was an automated option that could pick up say 5-10 people in my area and act more like a taxi or shuttle, I would consider using it. A bus that stops every block gets very tough for work day commuting.  Buses for longer trips that don't make stops make sense but around town a nimbler option seems more effective. 
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
6/22/2016 | 5:03:12 PM
Re: The future of AI in cars
SaneIT, 

Volvo connected trucks used by logistics companies already exist. More autonomous feautures will be added as the technology advances and is adopted. These trucks make truck drivers life much easier, since drivers can have some hours of sleep. They save fuel and are safer since they eliminate road accidents caused by human error.

The same could be done with public transport systems. I see what you say viable for trials in current real smart cities, like Nice, for example.

Watch a platoon that recently completed a journey across Europe.

-Susan  

SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/22/2016 | 8:08:08 AM
Re: The future of AI in cars
I think if the US was further ahead in its public transportation systems autonomous cars would be in even higher demand.  Part of the challenge is funding the purchase of these vehicles, if current bus routes could be replaced by smaller, more efficient, autonomous bus like vehicles it would push the technology development even faster.  Once those systems were developed and it was more convenient to use public transportation in smaller cites the technology would bleed into personal cars more quickly.  I think it will be a tough transition for the older generations but the kids being born today will think driving a car is as archaic as hitching up horses.  
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
6/22/2016 | 5:50:54 AM
Re: The future of AI in cars
Sane IT, 

Absolutely. Both groups you mention will benefit from AI and autonomous cars. It's not only in the US that it is noticeable less emphasis among the 16 to 18-year-olds around driving their own car. The same I have noticed in Europe.

I would make a difference, though, between having a driver's license and driving their own, or family owned car. Car share seems to be an option that many are taking. Then you have places like Amsterdam where there are more bicycles than cars. 

I completely agree with you about the kids who are born today. If we are expecting fully autonomous cars to be common by 2020-2021, by 2034 when those kids will be 18 most likely they won't choose to own an old car. And by then, every new car will be fully autonomous. In 20 years' time driving as we know it will be rare. 

-Susan

 
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/21/2016 | 8:13:59 AM
The future of AI in cars
I think that there are a couple of markets for AI in cars that will be very big influencers.  The first is the baby boomer generation aging to the point that driving is no longer an option.  The smaller Gen X behind them means there won't be the family support system to shuttle their parents around to doctor's appointments and grocery shopping trips.  As they age it's going to be tough to give up their freedoms and self-driving cars should extend those freedoms by at least 5-10 years. The second group is the upcoming batch of drivers that will turn 16-18 around 2020.  I see less emphasis around having a driver's license among current 16-18 year olds and that interest seems to be trending downward.  I think the kids being born today will have very little interest in driving especially if they can be driven by AI.  
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