Cellphone-Cancer Link Revealed In Government Study - InformationWeek

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Cellphone-Cancer Link Revealed In Government Study
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Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
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7/4/2016 | 8:41:57 AM
Re: Frequency killer
tjkg, 

I like your comment because it makes me think. :) Thank you. 

The fact that the death penalty has existed since the beginning of civilization is a proof of how little civilization has advanced. I see a difference between medical experimentation in inmates who are already sentenced to die for a grevious crime that have commited, which is the kind of medical experimentation I am talking about, and the medical experimentation during the Nazi era. 

In that case, I don't see any difference why people can support killing the prison in the "accepted" ways, and using that same prisoner for new drug testing and experimental treatments aimed to cure illnesses such as cancer. 

Medical experimentation on prisons took place in the US for decades. Prisoners were either paid for volunteering, or even released from the death sentence. It was in the mid-seventies that they stopped openly using inmates for medical research. 

From an ethical perspective, it is the same case you can see in hospitals with some terminal patients who choose to volunteer for experimental medical treatments for their condition. If it works, they live; if inot, they are going to die anyway. But it's a step ahead in getting to the right treatment to work on future patients.

 

-Susan  
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
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6/10/2016 | 12:33:22 PM
Re: Frequency killer
@hho: Thanks a lot. That makes me feel so much better.  :/  ;)
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
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6/7/2016 | 9:43:40 AM
Re: Frequency killer
@hho: I used to hold my phone away from my head and talk on speakerphone when possible so as to avoid the possibility of a brain tumor.  Now I do that because it's easier and I have trouble hearing the other person when not on speakerphone.  Either the phone is getting old or I am.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
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6/4/2016 | 10:29:59 AM
Re: Frequency killer
@hho: And have to go in for regular colonscopies?  No thanks!  :/
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
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6/4/2016 | 9:47:30 AM
Re: Frequency killer
Whoopty, the Third Reich type of scenario you mentioned was very different from what I am saying. tgj... mentioned below also that even with their consent there could be legal or social issues.

Then, do you agree with the death penalty, but think that using prisoners who are already sentenced to death to test new drugs that could, for example, advance treatments or even cure cancer and other illnesses is not ethical? 

In your opinion, why would you say the death penalty is morally accepted, but, on the other hand, using murderers, serial killers, etc. for lab testing to save good people's lives would send society down to the times of Hitler? Again, I don't believe it's the right comparison, if you allow me to say.

Where do you see the logic? 

-Susan  
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
6/4/2016 | 9:08:31 AM
Re: Frequency killer
tjgkg,

It's most likely the way you say it would be, but it doesn't make any sense to me. For instance, how is it Okay to kill a criminal sending them to the electric chair, or administering a lethal injection, and not Okay to use them for some good to society testing drugs that could serve to save good people? Testing in humans drugs that are intended to be used on humans makes more sense than using mice, or any other animal. 

Could you explain one thing is Okay and not the other? How would the law accepts one, and not the other? Think of murderers, serial killers, etc. Would society be compasionate? Would society prefer to keep seeing their relatives and friends die from illnesses that could have a cure if scientistist could properly test new drugs in real proportions on those humans whom the law and society are killing anyway? 

If you can explain the logic to me I might be able to understand. Otherwise, it doesn't make sense to me.

-Susan 
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
6/4/2016 | 8:10:50 AM
Re: Cell phone harard
Bill, 

Neither do I. No one in he world will give up their smartphone for anything. This kind of recycled research has been going on for years with always the same results reported in a different way. The resources could be used for something more productive. 

-Susan 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
6/2/2016 | 12:30:48 PM
Re: Frequency killer
Yeah, then you wind up with testicular or ovarian cancer instead of brain cancer.  :p
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Author
5/31/2016 | 10:31:20 PM
Re: Frequency killer
Form what I understand, there is still a risk from holding the phone and wearing the phone not just holding it to your head.
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Author
5/31/2016 | 12:09:56 PM
Re: Frequency killer
The key is determining at what length of time and frequency the issue really materializes. The phones have gotten better over the years from my understanding at reducing the amount the level of the frequencies as our infrastructure has evolved. For people who sleep with their phones, I think they are always introducing more risk into their life at multiple levels. I don't think any of this research will stop the usage of phones it's getting more widespread at a younger age with the average first phone being had at 10 years old!!!
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