Salesforce Outage: Can Customers Trust The Cloud? - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Comments
Salesforce Outage: Can Customers Trust The Cloud?
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
6/1/2016 | 8:09:46 PM
Re: Outages
@Broadway: It will likely depend upon the specifics of the contracts/SLAs.  Cloud providers know that outages can and do happen (albeit rarely on a big scale), so they tend to attempt to protect themselves as much as possible -- esp. b/c a lot of cloud customers can't/don't negotiate with them.  We'll see.

In any case, if there is a penalty or some other consideration Salesforce owes, and it provides it/pays it, then there's probably no lawsuit.
Broadway0474
50%
50%
Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
5/22/2016 | 10:23:55 PM
Re: Outages
moarsauce, you're right to say it's infrastructure and should be considered like any other aspect of infrastructure --- sewage, water, etc. etc. The problem is that the free marketers probably believe all of that should be taken away from the public sector. 
moarsauce123
50%
50%
moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/21/2016 | 9:47:42 AM
Re: Outages
The core problem is lack of competition and for profits owning the infrastructure. Where I live the options for a business are TimeWarner (soon to be Comcast), Verizon, and black fiber from Sprint. TWC just doesn't cut it for anything bigger than a mom & pop shop. Leaves two to pick from and that is just not enough competition. There is no interest in increasing service quality and lowering pricing when the providers get 50% of the market give or take a few percent. Also, many sign up with both so that they have an alternative if one goes down.

Also troublesome is that the infrastructure is owned by typically one for profit company. They may lease lines to competitors so that they recoup an investment quicker, but generally it is a walled garden. The intent is also to keep business expenses low, which causes investments into infrastructure to be kept at a minimum unless there is a clear, high ROI in a short period.

What we need is an enttity that operates like a non-profit with the sole task to provide infrastructure accessible to anyone interested at exactly the same access fee. Any income made by that organization is to be directly invested in operations, maintenance, and improvements. That opens the door to more competition because established companies as well as newcomers operate on a level playing field.

One approach hotly debated are municipal networks. Cities, towns, and counties invest into top notch communications infrastructure for their own use as well as offering to local businesses and consumers. The goal is to interconnect these networks so that communications can flow from one network to the next. This is how Sweden built up their Internet infrastructure and other European countries did the same. In several places the infrastructure is already in place because the network operator is or until recently was a federally owned entity.

Administrations should not get involved in manufacturing and services except for infrastructure (streets, rail, water and sewage, gas, electricity, telecom) and public services (fire, police, public parks, etc). That seems to be the only way to get a reliable backbone for everyone to use rather than depend on penny pinching for profits that exclusively tune their operations for quarterly results and shareholder value. A public entity is also the only vehicle that is subject to public control, yet it still needs to be run and treated like a business. My proposal is not about building bridges to nowhere. Others have done this with great success. Sadly, some political forces in the US are totally against this idea, calling it communism, anti-business, and due to lack of real arguments "anti-american". Until that moronic view changes we will have companies nail coax to bean poles next to the roads and charge a ridiculously amount of money for craptastic service without facing much competition.
Broadway0474
50%
50%
Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
5/20/2016 | 11:04:36 PM
Re: Outages
moarsauce, how are we a developed economy that has such scarcity of such a vital 21st century resource? Is it just me, or is it shocking that this is another example of the degradation of our infrastructure?
tigger2
50%
50%
tigger2,
User Rank: Strategist
5/14/2016 | 11:45:10 AM
Ease of update vs safety
Right now my franchise business has a three tier data base design - capture and save on a local machine, capture and process several machines on another local server, and then upload information to the national server. The software upgrade process goes in reverse and has its own set of issues when local machines don't get upgraded. The national company is moving to Salesforce where software updates are instaneous to all users since it is browser driven on the Salesforce servers. At the same time all data is captured in the cloud - only. If I lost five hours of client captured data during my busy season I think I would have to close my doors. Recovery seems impossible to me and my legal exposure beggars imagination. Quite frankly this scare the h**l out of me.
moarsauce123
50%
50%
moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/14/2016 | 10:27:13 AM
Re: Outages
The servers of the cloud service providers failing are one concern, but one that the providers can compensate. As a business I'd be more concerned about the connection between my office and the cloud servers. Fast and reliable Internet connectivity with low latency that is affordable is a scarce resource especially in the US. As a business that relies on cloud services such as Salesforce two or better three quickly available Internet connections need to be in place as well as plans B and C to switch business over to in-house or non-tech solutions.
Broadway0474
50%
50%
Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
5/13/2016 | 10:47:10 PM
Re: Outages
Is there no financial ramification to Salesforce for such outtages? You have the exec quoted in the article clearly exasperated about the financial impact to his company. Will he next sue Salesforce to recoup those damages? Will he make a claim to his insurance company? Somebody's got to pay right?
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
5/13/2016 | 9:54:06 AM
Outages
Funny timing, with Salesforce Connections happening this week in Atlanta.

This has been a perennial concern with the cloud -- particularly since the AWS outages of 2011.  It's something tha thas to go into the risk/cost-benefit analysis, to be sure.  Outages are rare, but the more you aggregate data and servers, the more impactful outages will be.
TechYogJosh
50%
50%
TechYogJosh,
User Rank: Black Belt
5/13/2016 | 9:14:05 AM
What is the point?
Are we saying the on-premise systems dont go down? May be cloud goes down and impacts a lot of users. Isn't this better? May be your competitors have deployed the same cloud SaaS too. Which means in earlier days if your on-premise systems have gone down, your competitor could benefit. But now all of you are tied to the cloud SaaS and if it goes down you all are impacted. I believe this is a better alternative. On a serious note, every system goes down and focusing on cloud SaaS as it's a better story is unethical. We need to understand cloud resiliency is significantly higher than on-premise systems. Therefore, if enterprises start taking their workloads in-house due to such incidents it will be short sighted and they will repent that in the future.
jimbo0117
50%
50%
jimbo0117,
User Rank: Strategist
5/12/2016 | 7:10:57 PM
Re: Can Salesforce afford tol lose four hours of customer data?
Last time I checked, 09:53 UTC until 14:53 UTC is five hours of data lost, not four.
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
The State of Cloud Computing - Fall 2020
Download this report to compare how cloud usage and spending patterns have changed in 2020, and how respondents think they'll evolve over the next two years.
News
Top 10 Data and Analytics Trends for 2021
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  11/13/2020
Commentary
Where Cloud Spending Might Grow in 2021 and Post-Pandemic
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  11/19/2020
Slideshows
The Ever-Expanding List of C-Level Technology Positions
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  11/10/2020
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Why Chatbots Are So Popular Right Now
In this IT Trend Report, you will learn more about why chatbots are gaining traction within businesses, particularly while a pandemic is impacting the world.
White Papers
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Sponsored Video
Flash Poll