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Apple Vs. The FBI: Protecting The Poetry Of Code
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Banacek
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Banacek,
User Rank: Ninja
4/1/2016 | 12:12:38 PM
back doors
Oh, and as a point about the 'security' of back doors, just look at luggage locks. The only ones you're allowed to use on travel are to be TSA certified, and all have a special key for use by the TSA to open them up. Their own secret back door.

Except the secret to the backdoor has been revealed, either by leak of someone with the special key(s) or just by reverse engineering the thing. Either way, you can now find all you need to know to make your own special TSA key and break into any luggage you see fit.

The amount of time and money this country (and it's people) spend living in fear of terrorists just goes to show how the terrorists are winning their 'battle'. If it was just a white guy named Jones who went in and shot up the San Bernadino public health center, we would have had lots of discussions about how guns are the issues, it's mental illness. Or guns are the problem. Or it was a race thing. But nowhere would you have people saying "We need more access to people's phones and emails to prevent this kind of thing!". But stick 'muslim' on it, and now we need court cases and more 'security' and 'protections'.
Banacek
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Banacek,
User Rank: Ninja
4/1/2016 | 12:03:19 PM
Re: What's to be done?
I'm glad you support the right of these people to go to court to get warrants, as this is in the constitution it's legal anyway. That's not my problem.

My problem is with government overreach. Perhaps if they hadn't spent the last 200 years overstepping their own boundaries (the CIA shouldn't be operating in the US, but has been caught doing so, the NSA reading and listening to everything, and both using special 'rooms on foreign soil' to work around the legal issues). On top of that, we have seen time and time again that the government can't be trusted not to keep information out of the hands of bad people (the snowden leaks, the wikileaks, the OPM breach, the FBI breach, the IRS breaches, NSA workers using their credentials to spy on girlfriends and the like, need I go on).

So now we have the government wanting backdoors into devices in order to get access under 'warranted circumstances'. But what restrictions will be on them to make sure they are under warrants and not just because there's a suspicion? And when the backdoor is released to the world (as it will be), and all the terrorists now have access to American's information and phones, who's protecting us then?

And if American companies put in back doors, what's to stop terrorists from just using foreign phones? Or jailbreak their phone and put their own modified OS on it? Or just use encryption software on their own?
Francoman
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100%
Francoman,
User Rank: Guru
4/1/2016 | 10:50:03 AM
What's to be done?
What is the real issue here?  First, there are evil actors in the real world, and we charge our security forces with protect us from these bad actors.  The security people want us to abandon our right to privacy so they can protecting us.  I do not support any wholesale abandonment of our right to privacy.

However, I do support the right of security personnel to take probable cause to the courts in order to obtain a lawful search warrant.  The risk Apple takes by ignoring their obligations to contribute to public security may backfire.  If you carefuly parse Apples statement, they base their actions on an abundance of concern for thier customers.  Their concern is not with protecting the public, and that is where Apple bcomes vulnerable.

I believe that Apples does have obligations to public security, and this is the point where our disfuctional Congress needs to carefully balance the public's right to privacy with the need for all of us to contribute to our security.  The moment a terrorist's Apple phone is shown to have contained data that could have saved the lives of hundreds of men, women and children, Apple could well go from the protect of the right to privacy to an enabler of terror.  Apple and the tech industry should work with Congress and the Executive Branch to forge reasonable public policy on the issue.

 

 

 
Francoman
50%
50%
Francoman,
User Rank: Guru
4/1/2016 | 10:50:01 AM
What's to be done?
What is the real issue here?  First, there are evil actors in the real world, and we charge our security forces with protect us from these bad actors.  The security people want us to abandon our right to privacy so they can protecting us.  I do not support any wholesale abandonment of our right to privacy.

However, I do support the right of security personnel to take probable cause to the courts in order to obtain a lawful search warrant.  The risk Apple takes by ignoring their obligations to contribute to public security may backfire.  If you carefuly parse Apples statement, they base their actions on an abundance of concern for thier customers.  Their concern is not with protecting the public, and that is where Apple bcomes vulnerable.

I believe that Apples does have obligations to public security, and this is the point where our disfuctional Congress needs to carefully balance the public's right to privacy with the need for all of us to contribute to our security.  The moment a terrorist's Apple phone is shown to have contained data that could have saved the lives of hundreds of men, women and children, Apple could well go from the protect of the right to privacy to an enabler of terror.  Apple and the tech industry should work with Congress and the Executive Branch to forge reasonable public policy on the issue.

 

 

 
Michelle
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0%
Michelle,
User Rank: Ninja
3/31/2016 | 10:44:22 PM
Achievement unlocked: 1st Amendment Exercised
There's never a problem with those in charge until there is. There are so many issues with a case like this if it had gone to court. It's very good the FBI got into the phone in the end without going forward with litigation that could affect citizens for generations. 


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