Apple Should Have Same Confidentiality Rights As Attorneys, Priests - InformationWeek

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Apple Should Have Same Confidentiality Rights As Attorneys, Priests
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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
3/18/2016 | 9:14:39 AM
Re: ehhhhh
The data already exists for him -- or anyone else -- to make an educated guess based strictly on geography.  pornhub.com/insights/united-states-top-searches
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
2/29/2016 | 2:30:49 PM
Re: Hardened iCloud
@jnskm,

I share your sentiment. I also use an Iphone because it is a more secure device, same reason why many companies also use it, but not only for communication purposes, but also for running custom apps that complemente their business, and they rely on data being secured.

It's very sad that Apple is in this situation, where they are trying to force it's hand. Thankfully most folks have sided on Apple's part and what seems to be right.

Let's see how this pans out.
jnskm
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jnskm,
User Rank: Moderator
2/29/2016 | 2:23:47 PM
Hardened iCloud
As far as I know Apple has helped authorities by giving them synced iCloud data and/or backups. Right now iCloud data is not fingerprint/passcode encrypted like data on our iPhones. But I here Apple is working on making iCloud like that. When (not if) this happens Apple will no longer be able to respond to authorities because it won't be able to access that data.

Apple should be left as a private company to work on providing hardware, software, and services. I use an iPhone precisely because I know my data will be safe, and not be shared among government workers, sold to advertisers, or stolen and sold in black markets.
BrooklynNellie2
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BrooklynNellie2,
User Rank: Moderator
2/29/2016 | 1:37:40 PM
Re: ehhhhh
Do you really want Barack Obama to be able to see what sort of porn you prefer?
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
2/29/2016 | 12:29:44 PM
Re: ehhhhh
Good point >> but extending testimonial privilege to tech companies would be very different than existing testimonial privileges.

Perhaps one of the sillier arguments around
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
2/29/2016 | 9:23:45 AM
Re: ehhhhh
I don't know, I think there is a fine line between being concerned about consititutional rights and being a paranoid anti-government zealot. If there is information on those San Bernadino phones about some future plot which could end up killing one of my loved ones, I can tell you I vote for letting the FBI take a look. If it means that the Feds may end up looking at my phone data and seeing what kind of stuff I am texting my wife, I'm willing to make the trade off.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
2/29/2016 | 9:08:58 AM
Re: ehhhhh
>Unless you are involved in criminal activity, who gives a fat flip?

 

If that's how you view privacy rights, why have them at all? Just throw out the Constitution because every action the government takes is perfectly calibrated and lawful. Only the guilty get accused. Only criminals go to prison.

But don't complain when your bank account gets emptied because some hacker was able to install malware on your phone remotely using technology built on Apple's backdoor, obtained from someone with ties to a foreign government or intelligence service.

Take a look at The Athens Affair to see what can go wrong when you have a lawful intercept system (backdoor) build into telecom hardware.
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
2/29/2016 | 7:09:07 AM
Re: ehhhhh
This is one of those cases where I say "who cares?". Who cares if the government has access to Google, Microsoft, Apple, etc etc data. Yes, I use those things, but if the government were to look at my stuff there wouldn't be all that much to get excited about. Unless you are involved in criminal activity, who gives a fat flip?
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
2/29/2016 | 7:07:30 AM
Bravo
Couldn't agree more. This is an excellent interpretation of how companies that store our digital data and provide communication platforms should be considered. 

I really can't tell if the FBI and other organisations don't see how far reaching this ruling will be, or just don't care and want unrestricted access to all data? Either way it's not good. 
nasimson
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nasimson,
User Rank: Ninja
2/28/2016 | 10:58:56 AM
Re: ehhhhh
@tzubair: Not just that. Once Apple concedes to FBI, Russians, Europeans, Mexicans, Pakistanis, Indians are next in line to demand that access from Apple. It's a slippery slope.
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