Tim Cook Vs. FBI: Why Apple Is Fighting The Good Fight - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Comments
Tim Cook Vs. FBI: Why Apple Is Fighting The Good Fight
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
<<   <   Page 4 / 6   >   >>
Brian.Dean
50%
50%
Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
2/24/2016 | 6:21:11 AM
Re: Situation could have been avoided
Yes, you are right. It seems that the employee created all the necessary accounts as a consumer would create if the consumer had purchased the phone.

As a general rule of thumb, I would imagine that if an enterprise purchases a device, it will include a control layer to limit the amount of rogue applications that can be activated on the device. A remove switch to turn the device off in the case of theft or the disgruntled employee. And, recover the device if a password has been forgotten.  
Broadway0474
50%
50%
Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2016 | 11:22:00 PM
Re: Apple vs FBI
jastroff, who knows how to retrieve the wanted info? Apple or the government? And if the latter, why don't they want to do it? Because they want the reuseable backdoor? They want the public win? 
vnewman2
50%
50%
vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2016 | 4:59:09 PM
Re: Situation could have been avoided
I wonder exactly what (owned but not managed) means?  They paid for it, but listed this guy as having admin rights to the account?  Maybe he set up the account on his own accord?  Strange
jastroff
50%
50%
jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2016 | 4:22:22 PM
Re: Apple vs FBI
Great offer by John M -- seems like the Govt can use some help. Although as Bill Gates has tipped Apple's hand, they do know full well how to retrieve the information wanted. They don't want to do it. 
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
2/23/2016 | 1:34:29 PM
Re: Apple vs FBI
Funnily enough, John McAfee has boasted that if the federal government hires him, he and his team will crack the phone inside of three weeks.

The degree to which he is blowing smoke remains to be seen, but the guy does have the street cred.
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
2/23/2016 | 1:32:55 PM
Re: With apologies to Archer...
@nomii: It's still the creation of a backdoor -- one that can become stolen, reutilized, reexploited.  This is why Apple is taking a stand.
cyclepro
50%
50%
cyclepro,
User Rank: Moderator
2/23/2016 | 12:20:05 PM
Apple vs FBI
I see Tim Cooks point. You would think that the goverment has enough talent on their side to crack the phone itself and would not need Apple to do it for them.

 
jagibbons
50%
50%
jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2016 | 7:11:07 AM
Re: Situation could have been avoided
The administrative tools exist. They may not be in use in this case, which is a failure for San Bernardino County.
Brian.Dean
50%
50%
Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2016 | 7:06:12 AM
Re: Situation could have been avoided
That is a great point. If the phone is the property of the Department of Public Health then, I feel that the department should request their vendor to unlock their property. And, if the department wants to share the content of the phone with the FBI, it is their decision.

If a user misplaces the password for their smartphone, I imagine that the user will be requesting Samsung or Apple to provide a new password.
Brian.Dean
50%
50%
Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2016 | 6:38:47 AM
Re: With apologies to Archer...
The military-industrial complex is not good for business or the economy. If enough capital is invested into a system then, any security measure can be circumvented, NSA was an example of this and the result of exercising capital was that the IT industry suffered losses in the billions. The same losses might occur if capital is substituted with authority to circumvent security as it will erode consumer confidences. 

On the flip side, if base security needs (food, shelter and laws) are not provided by an economy then, it too can erode business confidences. 

A third player might be useful in this situation, to decide when to circumvent the security environment of private firms to arrive at an optimum outcome and when not to circumvent security. However, overtime the third player will either be viewed as biased towards the FBI or Apple, etc.  
<<   <   Page 4 / 6   >   >>


2020 State of DevOps Report
2020 State of DevOps Report
Download this report today to learn more about the key tools and technologies being utilized, and how organizations deal with the cultural and process changes that DevOps brings. The report also examines the barriers organizations face, as well as the rewards from DevOps including faster application delivery, higher quality products, and quicker recovery from errors in production.
Slideshows
10 Top Cloud Computing Startups
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  8/3/2020
Commentary
How Enterprises Can Adopt Video Game Cloud Strategy
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  7/28/2020
Commentary
Conversational AI Comes of Age
Guest Commentary, Guest Commentary,  8/7/2020
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Special Report: Why Performance Testing is Crucial Today
This special report will help enterprises determine what they should expect from performance testing solutions and how to put them to work most efficiently. Get it today!
White Papers
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Sponsored Video
Flash Poll