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Microsoft Windows Phone Headed Toward Zombieland?
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mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
1/29/2016 | 3:37:25 PM
Not out of the game yet
Excellent Article,

Althought I truly do like Windows Phones, the competition is just to fierce. That and the lack of apps doesn't provide the recipy for success that one needs to achive a win in the very crowded smartphone ecosystem (blackberry learned this leasson the hardway)

Thanks to this article, I do have a of questions:

- Why does Microsoft want to be succesful in the smartphone space? I mean, they are good at PC and productivity software/hardware... and it's obvious they are not going to get enought of a piece of a pie with consumers regarding smartphones.

I think the concept of a surface with the form factor of smartphone is definitly something to consider, since we're looking at something as similar as an Ipod Touch, which does have it's market share.

I myself have a Windows phone that's purely used for entertainment purposes. It's not activated, but it runs apps for my kids to play with, ít's great as an MP3 player (I use Groove and like it so far). Obviosly having a Windows Surface that's 5 to 5 inches with screen size is taking away from the windows tablets.... but I think Microsoft just needs to decide what they want to focus on.

The people have spoken when it comes to trying to venture into the smarphone business... the likes of Blackberry and Amazon have crashed and burned... so it's best to learn from others.

 
melgross
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melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
1/29/2016 | 9:53:51 PM
Enterprise sales?
Who, in the enterprise, is buying Win Phone? Why would they? As has been shown year after year, Win Phone lags even Android in security. It also has the least enterprise features of the other platforms. So, what would be the point? And why support a platform that is dying? Large organizations just don't do that.
melgross
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melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
1/29/2016 | 9:58:01 PM
Re: Not out of the game yet
Microsoft isn't going to build a Surface the size of a phone. The talk is that they will build a Surface Phone. But what difference will that make? I really can't understand what a surface Phone would be. If it continues to use ARM, then it still won't be any different from Win Phone now. If it uses x86, it will be forced to use the lower end Atom chip line, which won't allow any real Windows apps to run well. And as has been reported, Microsoft's Windows phone guy, has been using an iPhone. So it seems as though even Microsoft thinks the game is over.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2016 | 12:08:18 AM
Re: Not out of the game yet
@mejiac that is a great question. I think Microsoft feels that if it does not capture an acceptable size of the smartphone market then, its productivity software/business might come under fire. Google/Android is already pushing towards PC type productivity by allowing Android devices to display on a large screen LCD and the likes.

Microsoft's exercise in the smartphone market has produced at least one positive outcome i.e. it might be the only firm in the world with the most experience on How Not to make a smartphone. It only requires one series of a smartphone to be a success and the entire dynamics of the market will changes.

 
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2016 | 10:20:00 AM
Re: Not out of the game yet
 

"That and the lack of apps doesn't provide the recipy for success that one needs to achive a win in the very crowded smartphone ecosystem (blackberry learned this leasson the hardway)"

 

@mejiac: The lack of apps being there is definately a major factor but it seems like a vicious circle. Developers don't make apps because there aren't enough users to download them. Users don't use the platform because there aren't enough apps. There's only little Microsoft can do to intervene in the process. Incentivising developers and actually paying them to develop apps is one option. Similarly, lowering the prices and bringing users to buy is another just to increase that user base. What Microsoft chooses to do would be interesting to see.
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2016 | 10:29:35 AM
Re: Not out of the game yet
 

"I think Microsoft feels that if it does not capture an acceptable size of the smartphone market then, its productivity software/business might come under fire."

 

@Brian: I don't think that's likely to happen. On the contrary, what Microsoft should be doing is to push the smartphone business through the software business. It needs to develop better version of its own apps like Office an Exchange to show the users of how productive the platform is. Almost everyone is a fan of Office and the Exchange and they'd want the same experience on the phone. Having something exclusive for Windows Phones is what might attract more users.
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2016 | 10:42:02 AM
Re: Not out of the game yet
 

"And as has been reported, Microsoft's Windows phone guy, has been using an iPhone. So it seems as though even Microsoft thinks the game is over."

 

@melgross: He's also said to have mentioned the reason behind this - he wanted to try out other platforms to see what they bring in and where the windows phone experience lacks. Microsoft has recently allowed people to start using whatever devices they want to use after Nadella took over.
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2016 | 10:48:00 AM
Re: Enterprise sales?
"Who, in the enterprise, is buying Win Phone? Why would they? As has been shown year after year, Win Phone lags even Android in security. It also has the least enterprise features of the other platforms. So, what would be the point? And why support a platform that is dying? Large organizations just don't do that."

@melgross: That's a valid point. As of this point, Microsoft does lack certain features like security which would put the enterprise users off. But the enterprise segment does represent an oppotunity which MS can captialize on if it improves the products to suit their need. It has connections in the enterprise through the Office suits and other apps and what it needs is better products to up sell phones to these customers.
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2016 | 11:01:00 AM
Re: Not out of the game yet
The Windows Phone is dead. Microsoft should save any energy they planned on gearing towards the phone on focus on the tablet market before that slips through their fingers too.
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2016 | 11:06:24 AM
Re: Enterprise sales?
Exactly. I can'r remember the last time I even saw a Windows phone in the workplace. I can't remember even seeing one the last time I was in the Verizon Store...
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