Google Goes Beyond Cardboard With Revamped VR Focus - InformationWeek

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Google Goes Beyond Cardboard With Revamped VR Focus
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kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
1/26/2016 | 11:27:23 AM
price point

"but how many games will be so much better with VR that consumers want to spend hundreds or thousands of dollars in extra hardware for the premium experience?"

And this is going to be the problem. People are usually willing to spend a few hundred for a promising game or two, (think World of Warcraft, or the Sims franchise where people spent hundreds in expansion packs and monthly subscriptions for a single game) but the price point needs to come down for people to be willing to take a chance on a system that might just gather dust, or have it priced in stages so the equipment is a monthly rental like a subscription where the the cost is spread out over time. VR and AR have some real potential, but it need to get to the point where main stream audiences can afford it.

Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
1/14/2016 | 5:54:04 PM
Re: surgery
@Brian It's great when technology can be applied in that way, to make real improvements in people's lives. I know there's a lot of money to be made in entertainment applications, but I am far more impressed by these .
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
1/14/2016 | 5:41:37 PM
Re: surgery
@Ariella, thank you for recommending the book -- it has been added to my list of books that are a must read.

VR, smartphones and apps are starting to produce a large number of valuable use cases. For instance, there was a report about VR being utilized to treat veterans that experienced traumatic events during their duty and another that was utilizing VR to treat arachnophobia.
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
1/14/2016 | 3:35:07 PM
Re: surgery
@Brian Google cardboad only cost about $20, according to that article, though it did also need a smartphone with a downloaded app to work at imaging the baby's heart. If you're interested in applications of technology to healthcare, I highly recommend Dr. Eric Topol's book The Patient Will See You Now: The Future of Medicine is in Your Hands 
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
1/14/2016 | 2:40:11 PM
Good analysis
Good analysis on the nature of virtual reality and where we're at.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
1/14/2016 | 6:12:37 AM
Re: surgery
Imagining technology advances and it is easy to overlook the benefits that it is providing. However, if we compare the latest technology with the previous generation then, the benefits become clear. For instance, X-Ray machines used to take an hour to take and process an image, only to find out in the end that the X-Ray image is not focused and the entire process had to be repeated currently, computational capabilities in an X-Ray machine has made it possible to complete the entire process in 5 minutes or less.

Devices that are part of the healthcare spectrum might not be under the same price point constraints that a consumer device is under. For the consumer segment, devices such as, Samsung's Gear VR at $99 seems to be a price that can commercialize VR for the masses.
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
1/13/2016 | 8:26:00 PM
surgery
Bavor's tweet links to this story: http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/07/health/google-cardboard-baby-saved/index.html The baby was born with only one lung and part of her heart missing.  She lived longer than doctors first thought she would but needed surgery. The first plan was to make a 3D model of her heart, as had been done before. But the 3D printer broke. That forced the surgeons to come up with another approach:

"Using an app called Sketchfab, Muniz downloaded images of Teegan's heart onto his iPhone and showed them to Burke.

They were similar, yet different from 3-D images they'd been using on computer screens. With the goggles, it was possible to move around and see the heart from every angle -- to almost be inside the heart checking out its structure.

Burke looked through the Google Cardboard, and visualized what he could do to fix Teegan's heart."

 

 



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