Stanford Scientists Develop Safer Battery Material - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Comments
Stanford Scientists Develop Safer Battery Material
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
kstaron
50%
50%
kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
1/26/2016 | 11:01:26 AM
How will this affect price?
I had no idea lithium batteries were so volatile. It's good to see they are developing technology to make them safer since so many things in the world use them now. How will using this material affect the price of lithium batteries? Is the addition minimal or will the cost in production go up significantly?
Brian.Dean
50%
50%
Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
1/14/2016 | 4:08:08 PM
Re: Investment Needed
The Gigafactory is a great move that can drop the price of a lithium ion battery pack by 30% using economies of scale. However, it is based on the bet that a similar technology that caters to similar applications (devices, cars, homes and the electric grid) will not be developed within the next few years. If a technology is developed, the Gigafactory will lose +30% of the value of its assets.

The only other technology that seems to be able to compete with lithium ion is the liquid metal battery from Ambri. The battery operates at extremely high temperate, causing it to require a minimum level of size and capacity (for example, the size of a 24 foot container). It makes the battery practical only for the grid and large setups.

Nevertheless, if the liquid metal battery is successful in grid environments then, it would cause the Gigafactory to lose the grid market and only sell its batteries for vehicle, home and device applications -- at an even lower price.
Whoopty
50%
50%
Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
1/14/2016 | 8:03:11 AM
Re: Investment Needed
That's a really interesting point. Does the Gigafactory, with its push towards efficient manufacture, actually represent somewhat of a stagnation in battery technology, or is it versatile enough to be upgraded with new manufacturering processes over the years that follow its creation?

Considering some of the other materials being posited as potential alternatives for lithium too, I wonder if the Gigafactory can switch production to use those in the future? 
Brian.Dean
50%
50%
Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
1/14/2016 | 6:56:11 AM
Re: Investment Needed
That is a good point. Lithium ion batteries at an affordable price are required by the world. In 2015, there was not a lot of focus on batteries mainly due to low oil prices. However, oil prices will eventually change and batteries will be required everywhere -- cars, homes and devices, etc. This makes the Gigafactory extremely important but, massive investment also introduces the risk that innovation (safer polymer) cannot be introduced into the existing capital/machine/process of a factory.
Gary_EL
50%
50%
Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
1/14/2016 | 2:36:14 AM
Investment Needed
This is the continuation of a trend of new lithium ion batteries (LIB) to be built using "nano" particles. This might be trouble for some of the more established LIB producers, because the way you build these new types of LIBs is radically different from the "old" type of non-nano LIBs. The whole nature of the enormously expensive factory changes, largely because each type of battery construction poses different serious environmental issues that have to dealt with in different manners.
Charlie Babcock
50%
50%
Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
1/13/2016 | 3:00:13 PM
Better protection than the TSA?
Defective lithium ion batteries in laptops were always a much greater threat to bring down a U.S. airliner than terrorists, in my opinion. Think of the misplaced oxygen bottle incident that downed a ValueJet in the Everglades and multiple by several thousand times per day. Batteries containing nickel coated with graphene nanoparticles sound like better protection than the TSA. 


The State of IT & Cybersecurity Operations 2020
The State of IT & Cybersecurity Operations 2020
Download this report from InformationWeek, in partnership with Dark Reading, to learn more about how today's IT operations teams work with cybersecurity operations, what technologies they are using, and how they communicate and share responsibility--or create risk by failing to do so. Get it now!
Slideshows
10 Cyberattacks on the Rise During the Pandemic
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  6/24/2020
News
IT Trade Shows Go Virtual: Your 2020 List of Events
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  5/29/2020
Commentary
Study: Cloud Migration Gaining Momentum
John Edwards, Technology Journalist & Author,  6/22/2020
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Key to Cloud Success: The Right Management
This IT Trend highlights some of the steps IT teams can take to keep their cloud environments running in a safe, efficient manner.
White Papers
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Sponsored Video
Flash Poll