Google Goes With OpenJDK For Android - InformationWeek

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Google Goes With OpenJDK For Android
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jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 10:24:25 AM
Understandable
While I would like to see the precedent set that programming languages and APIs are not ownable, Google is in the business of making money, and the current litigation with Oracle has to be a financial drain.  To that extent, OpenJDK strikes me as a reasonable compromise.

 
larryloeb
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larryloeb,
User Rank: Author
12/31/2015 | 10:30:35 AM
Re: Understandable
Yeah, it does.

And it gives them the appearance of being on the side of the developers, too.

Not to mention sticking it to Oracle,
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 11:28:59 PM
Re: Understandable
I am wondering if this will have an adverse impact on the security. If security is compromised I don't think users will like it. 
larryloeb
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larryloeb,
User Rank: Author
1/1/2016 | 6:52:16 AM
Re: Understandable
@shakeeb Open sourcing might actually make security better, I think.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
1/1/2016 | 4:35:33 PM
Re: Understandable
Android was already open source.  My understanding of this case is Google did not use any Oracle (Sun) API implementation.  They simply provided their own implementation of the Java run-time (i.e. Dalvik).  Google switching to the OpenJDK API shouldn't affect the quality or security of their product.  It's just a move to isolate future versions of Android and the diagreement they have with Oracle.
larryloeb
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larryloeb,
User Rank: Author
1/1/2016 | 5:15:22 PM
Re: Understandable
Yes, just so. Google did there own implementation of Java. Now the one used will be nonproprietary.
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 12:39:01 PM
Re: Understandable
@jries921: I think it makes sense. From what I recall, Google has several patented items in the Android OS which it pays for on a per user basis even though Android itself is open-source. The file system in the Android uses Microsoft's file system that was used way back in Win 95/98 and Google had to pay Microsoft for it for every user.
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 2:47:22 PM
Re: Understandable
Given the press MS has given to patent license agreements with Android OEMs, I would have to think that it would have trumpeted any such agreement with Google.  Since it has not, I have to believe that no such agreement has been made.  Given the usual claim by MS-boosters that MS is merely trying to "protect its intellectual property", it is rather curious that MS has never even threatened to sue Google over the supposed patent infringement; it leads me to suspect a lack of confidence in its claims as Google has deeper pockets and a bigger commitment to Android than do any of the OEMs; and is therefore much more likely to fight a lawsuit.

It has been surmised for some time that MS' VFAT patent is the reason wny many Android devices (such as my three year old Samsung Galaxy Nexus 2) do not have SD card slots, but that has never been publicly acknowledged.  It curious, though, that MS has never even threatened to sue Linux distributors or the Linux kernel developers over the same issue (support for VFAT is in the Linux kernel distributed with Android, not in Android per se).
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
1/1/2016 | 4:30:45 PM
Re: Understandable
MS probably didn't sue Google because if they won, what price would they put on the infringement?  Instead, they decided to litigate the handset makers.  From a licensing perspective, that makes sense because handset makers know the quantity and revenue from those sales.  That makes it easy for MS to ask a couple bucks per device.  The handset maker agrees rather than lose a suit and possibly owe the entire profit they made on the device.
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
1/1/2016 | 11:30:33 PM
Re: Understandable
@rradina, I would say it an interesting approach by Microsoft... hope Joe will put his two cents in as I would love to hear his point of view... 
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
1/3/2016 | 4:01:52 PM
Re: Understandable
The purpose of suing would be to stop the infringement.  Suing for profit is properly referred to as "trolling" and the negative connotations of the term are very much deserved.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
1/3/2016 | 8:49:10 PM
Re: Understandable
Company's also license their patents to others.  Take ARM for instance.  By your book, anyone who does that is a troll?
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
1/4/2016 | 2:41:34 PM
Re: Understandable
No.  But for trolls, the focus is on entrapment and strategic use of the legal system to extract maximum profit.  Trolls *want* their patents violated so they can extract licensing fees after the fact.  Note that to this day, MS refuses to publicly disclose exactly which patents are at issue in Android, which makes sense only if it wants to turn code it neither developed nor paid for into a cash cow.  If that is true, the very last thing MS wants is for Google to either contest the patent claims or eliminate the allegedly infringing code.

 If MS were really interested in deterring infringement of its patents, this would not be the way to go about it.
larryloeb
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larryloeb,
User Rank: Author
1/6/2016 | 9:46:00 AM
Re: Understandable
@jries

That makes sense, but it still makes me wnder just what MSFT thinks it has in Android.

If it is enabling (Android wouldn't work without it) they could control the use of the system. They haven't done that.
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 11:30:44 PM
Re: Understandable
@tzubair – I am wondering why they didn't use a file system of some other open source OS (Linux)
Michelle
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Michelle,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 10:42:33 PM
Re: Understandable
Wow, I thought the case ended and I missed it. This is probably a good move for Google in an effort to 'future proof' the OS. 
larryloeb
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larryloeb,
User Rank: Author
1/1/2016 | 6:50:46 AM
Re: Understandable
The case went back to a lower court after the Supes ducked it. Huge implications for the entire computer field in it. It ain't over until it's over. Yes Google is making sure Android will go on no matter what.
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2015 | 11:25:43 PM
Re: Understandable
I think this is yet another good initiative by Google. Also some good news for developers.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
1/2/2016 | 1:45:59 AM
Re: Understandable
The debating about licensing is always endless - as long as it can be. So choosing OpenJDK would a wise choice for Google and Oracle.
larryloeb
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larryloeb,
User Rank: Author
1/2/2016 | 9:49:58 AM
Re: Understandable
If Oracle prevails on this one the entire software field will suffer.


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