11 Things Computer Users Will Never Experience Again - InformationWeek

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11 Things Computer Users Will Never Experience Again
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jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
12/15/2015 | 5:45:15 PM
Re: A Giant leap
I have some staff members who have built PCs for specific purposes, but that is the exception rather than the norm. Even as a very experienced IT pro, the value of my time is worth more than the extra costs to buy a machine.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
12/15/2015 | 5:16:48 PM
Re: A Giant leap
I agree the days of these experiences are over. If the onboard sound device of a system is fried (extremely low probability) then, a user will purchase a USB sound card and will not get a chance to open their computer case.

A lot depends on a professional's line of work and recreational activities as some are still experiencing similar experiences while, building a gaming PC (SLI) and offshoot solar energy generation projects that employ the Arduino or Raspberry PI.
dwasifar
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dwasifar,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/15/2015 | 2:58:58 PM
I think this obituary is a bit premature.
Hand-building a machine is far from dead.  Granted that you don't have to buy serial cards, modems, or multimedia boards anymore, but the rest of these things are still out there for system builders, especially hardcore gamers who want to make a system to their own specs.  A quick look at Newegg, for example, will reveal literally hundreds of different motherboards, and over a thousand different video cards.
jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
12/15/2015 | 2:21:29 PM
Re: A Giant leap
Now, most computers are considered disposable rather than upgradable. That trend will continue. As more machines go smaller and more solid state, there isn't anything to upgrade anyway. Run it for as long as you can and then buy a new one.
Michelle
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Michelle,
User Rank: Ninja
12/15/2015 | 1:45:01 PM
Re: A Giant leap
I used an Apple IIe in first grade. My school had something very special that other schools in the area did not have: a computer lab. We learning keyboarding, database, and spreadsheets on these machines. We even tinkered with BASIC and Logo.

I ordered a custom machine once. It was obsolete within 2 years. Upgrades (at the time) were more trouble to order and replace than buying a new machine. 
jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
12/15/2015 | 9:29:41 AM
Re: A Giant leap
The first computer I used was an Apple IIe, all the way back in third grade. I remember WordPerfect on MS DOS in high school for "keyboarding" and "business applications" classes.

I only ever built one or two PCs. While I saved some money, I wasn't building for the experience or pride. It never ended up being worth the headaches.
ewoychowsky
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ewoychowsky,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/15/2015 | 8:31:35 AM
Subculture
There is still something of a build your own computer subculture, which is usually related to gaming or converting a decade-old computer into a home file server.  In the first case it's either a matter of price or getting exactly what you want, while in the second it is more of a matter of, "hey it still works."

Having added a couple of 2 TB hard drives, tripled the memory, a wireless adapter and replaced the optical drive in an old Dell, I'm more familiar with the latter case.  Add to that Linux is free and all of a sudden, you've got more storage than a 1980's era data center.

There will always be something of a build verse buy choice amount hobbyists that have a reason to build something.  As a matter of fact, I'm trying to come up with a justification to build a Beowulf cluster using Raspberry Pi computers.  I'm open to suggestions of what to use it for.
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
12/15/2015 | 8:02:33 AM
A Giant leap

Its indeed a giant leap for technology. I can remember using computers once it was IBM 286. Initially I was using computer in DOS mode but once I changed it to Win 95 it was somethong very exciting for me. After that the tech has revolutionized. The things are getting compact and all the accesories are available in smaller size with larger capacity. I am not sure where its going to end.

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