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Drone Registration Requirement Lands
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Ashu001
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Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
10/26/2015 | 2:21:19 PM
Re: These Things Shouldn't be Treated as Toys
Angel,

Very-very well said!

I could'nt agree more if I wanted to here.

In fact,its these very bad choices (where they either infringe on the Security or Privacy of ordinary law-abiding citizens) which causes most of the trouble today.

Sad but true reality.

But lets not forget or discount the Negative role played by the US Government also here.

Please see more here-theintercept.com/2015/10/23/drones-ibm-and-the-big-data-of-death
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
10/25/2015 | 10:10:14 PM
Re: These Things Shouldn't be Treated as Toys
@Susan, Good point. It is unfortunate that some people do have ill intentions which is a big reason why regulations have to be created and enforced. Like lots of things, the poor choices of a few impact the majority. I think regulation of drones is necessary because it has become a safety issue. However, I hope the powers that be are not primarily going forward with drone registration and regulation as a primary means to make money. I wonder how much the registration will cost per drone. I doubt it will be of no cost.
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
10/25/2015 | 10:04:59 PM
Re: These Things Shouldn't be Treated as Toys
@ Curtis, The questions you raise are valid. I was also wondering the logistics of rolling out the drone registration and how it would pertain to drones already purchased. I think that other regulations are yet to be determined and thought out as well. I think it will all come to fluition sooner than we think. I wonder what the bar is for how high a drone can fly in order for it to be considered necessary for it to be registered. Is there such a requirement in place or is drone registration required for all drones?
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
10/25/2015 | 9:58:20 PM
Re: Yes, but what if . . .
I think drone registration is a good idea. I think other parameters still need to be outlines and executed as well. I bet that is coming down the pike sooner than later.
Curt Franklin
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Curt Franklin,
User Rank: Strategist
10/23/2015 | 11:24:24 AM
Re: Yes, but what if . . .
@Susan, I'm looking forward to little flying warming ovens. What could possibly go wrong?

And with cameras and batteries getting smaller and smaller, unless they force everything down to rubber band-powered balsa planes to register, whatever threshold they set will see tremendous development just below the specs.
Curt Franklin
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Curt Franklin,
User Rank: Strategist
10/23/2015 | 11:20:10 AM
Re: These Things Shouldn't be Treated as Toys
@Susan, I think that registration and regulation will help, but there's a huge question, and a huge problem. The question is how the registration will happen: Will stores be forced to complete registration forms before they allow drones out the front door? Will consumers be responsible for filling out forms after they get the drone home? The mechanism is going to be incredibly important, especially since so many drones are sold via the Internet.

The problem is the millions of drones that have already been sold. The citizens of the U.S. have a poor track record when it comes to registering things just because the government asks them to do so. The mechanism for registering existing drones will be key. And if the solution imposes a fee on every airframe, then many hobbyists and experimenters will simply refuse.
Curt Franklin
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Curt Franklin,
User Rank: Strategist
10/23/2015 | 11:08:04 AM
Re: What Will Registration Accomplish?
@rradina, I think the idea of an electronic beacon "squawking" a registration ID is a good one. The only thing that remains to figure out, then, is whether to register drones or drone operators.

A lot of very smart people think that the FAA will model drone regulations on FAA aircraft registration. That makes sense bureaucratically but I still think that registering drone operators makes much more sense. Assign every operator a unique ID, code that ID into the beacon that's in place on every airframe they fly, and you've done what you want -- identify the operators who do stupid things.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
10/22/2015 | 7:13:07 AM
Re: Yes, but what if . . .
Curt, 

Yes, right? :D If they manage to get a drone delivery in, the pizza box would probably undergo a series of scans and security checks before it can actually reach the Obama girls. By then, the movie would have probably ended. No point for having the pizza then. 

Yes, the criteria will have an impact in drone manufacturers without a doubt, trying to keep them just below the registration bar will become very common, indeed. 

-Susan 
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
10/22/2015 | 7:00:27 AM
Re: These Things Shouldn't be Treated as Toys
Curt, 

Yes, I can understand that. It's also lack of thoughtfulness from the drone owners. That, or someone having not good intentions. In any case, drone regulations will fix the problem. 

-Susan 
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
10/21/2015 | 1:53:02 PM
Re: What Will Registration Accomplish?
Since the drone and operator can be significantly disconnected, adding it to any part of the fuselage seems easily defeated.  Without random checks, how will the FAA know the owner has tampered with the DIN?  The drone also has to be recovered by authorites after it's caused a problem worth pursuing.  There won't be enough resources to investigate every random airport incursion unless it really contributes to something horrible.  Even then if they cannot recover it, they still don't know who was flying it.

Although electronic signatures can be defeated, embedding the registered ID in control signals seems like the most resaonable approach.  From an airport perspective, monitoring equipment could record the flight signals and tie them to registered operators.  This evidence would be circumstantial but combined with pilot reports and survaillance video, it should be enough to at least detain and bring charges.  Most of all, the drone doesn't have to crash or even result in any harm to charge the operator.  Operate it in a restricted zone and police show up at your house.

This type of electronic, mostly automated and proactive enforcement would eliminate most if not all airport issues from folks who aren't purposely using them for terror (i.e. killing people in a plane).  Although monitoring should be permanent at airports, perhaps the FAA could rent time blocked but vulnerable venues portable equipment (i.e. ball games, parades, whatever and wherever drones might cause or have caused issues...)
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