Volkswagen: 11 Million Cars Used Deceptive Emissions Software - InformationWeek

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Volkswagen: 11 Million Cars Used Deceptive Emissions Software
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SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
9/24/2015 | 10:20:02 AM
Re: fine
@Mak63: Then VW can kiss their luck goodbye because although they have a lot of money, they would result in a crashing economy and their downfall would trigger the entire downfall of VW dependent companies. So EPA wouldn't call back 10 million cars because then we are looking at entire countries going bankrupt.
glenbren
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glenbren,
User Rank: Ninja
9/24/2015 | 10:17:01 AM
Re: DRM and deception
I read that in the US, automakers conduct their own tests and submit the results to the government. In Europe, the automakers can pick who does the tests and where. How do you consider that being regulated? No wonder they can cheat!
SachinEE
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50%
SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
9/24/2015 | 10:16:35 AM
Re: DRM and deception
No, it is not at all normal. Abnormality is fixed up and fake emission values. Maybe a single car or 100 cars doesn't make a difference. But 473,892 cars? Yup. That would make a difference. But lucky are those people who have owned a Golf before they pulled everything away.
SaneIT
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50%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
9/24/2015 | 9:46:59 AM
Re: DRM and deception
I heard this morning that the EU is going to start testing other "clean" diesel vehicles.  I'm guessing that if VW was doing it that someone else is playing similar games with the tests.  From what I hear the reason this actually worked is that the tests they are required to pass are poorly designed and don't reflect real world driving so they could get away with this while not making the owners of the vehicles hate driving them.
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
9/23/2015 | 3:11:11 PM
fine
If 482,000 diesel cars could get a fine up to $18 billion from the EPA, what would be the fine of the roughly 10 and a half million cars left from the EU and rest of the world?
DDURBIN1
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50%
DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
9/23/2015 | 10:13:36 AM
Yet politician have been tell us since Reagan businesses should self-regulate themselves

Another example of why government regulators and regulations are still necessary in most markets.  The all mighty buck still rules over common sense, allowing businesses to self-regulate results in none.  It's like playing football with no referees.

DDURBIN1
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50%
DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
9/23/2015 | 10:04:51 AM
Where were the Whisle Blowers
In a truly competitive market, why didn't Ford, GM or any other companies question VW's success? Generally the competition tears down a competitor's product to learn respond and provide competing products.  None did any whistle blowing which is just as concerning.
glenbren
100%
0%
glenbren,
User Rank: Ninja
9/23/2015 | 9:21:45 AM
Re: DRM and deception
Exactly, how extensive is this in the whole industry? What else are they willing to tamper with? It's already obvious with other recalls that our safety is not their biggest concern. 
SaneIT
50%
50%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
9/23/2015 | 8:24:32 AM
DRM and deception
I think the fact that they made it technically illegal to determine if they were doing anything illegal is an interesting game.  I remember years ago when the TDI vehicles came out and it was very big news that they could run as cleanly as they did while not being the sluggish diesels we had seen in decades past.   It was a great example of how technology had got us past one of the things that held diesel cars back.  Now we find out the technology that got them to perform for the EPA wasn't what it claimed to be.  This does bring up a good point though with the ever advancing technology in cars,  if the EPA takes years to figure out it was being duped how many other companies out there are playing the same shell game and how does a regulatory association keep up with the technology used to sneak around the rules?
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