Why Android Fragmentation Is A Good Thing - InformationWeek

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Why Android Fragmentation Is A Good Thing
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kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
8/19/2015 | 11:18:42 AM
Re: When did Baghdad Bob start writing for Information Week?
Allowing code writers a bit more freedom in what they write, allows for more diverse apps. By allowing them freedom they can sometimes come up with new ways to do things that are more streamlined, work better, and are a cut about what you could have gotten where the platform was not as diverse.
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
8/14/2015 | 10:19:16 PM
Re: When did Baghdad Bob start writing for Information Week?
Autigers, that's a bit harsh. It seemed to me a well thought-out, albeit opinionated piece. The idea of the benefits of diversity come from nature, by the way. Look at inbreeding. Any community of plants and animals that are subject to it ultimately die out, whether they be European monarchist dynasties or banana plantations. 
autigers1970
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autigers1970,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/8/2015 | 10:53:46 PM
When did Baghdad Bob start writing for Information Week?
Holy frick, what an utter shill.  I don't give a crap about a code writer's freedom of expression when it comes to what's on my device.  Did you read this back to yourself before publishing?  

 
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
8/8/2015 | 9:55:57 PM
Re: standard
Exactly - specification does not mean that every vendor will do the identical thing. It just sets up the basic rules for players so that application developers just need to create one Android app instead of mutiple versions. Diversity is always a good thing since it will bring healthy competition to the market.
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
8/8/2015 | 4:07:29 PM
Re: standard
Standards don't require a single vendor, or even a cartel.  There just needs to be a workable specification that anyone with the knowhow and resources can implement (without needing anyone's permission).  And if there end up being competing standards, they'll likely merge at some point, or one will come to predominate while the others decline (VHS vs Beta).

Free markets really do work when they're allowed to.
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
8/8/2015 | 4:00:31 PM
Agreed in full
It has become customary for "pro-business" commentators to praise competition in the abstract and then bemoan "market fragmentation" when it happens in real life (as if oligopoly were the ideal market configuration).  Thus I suggest that those who profess to believe in free markets let the market (ie. the general public) decide how many flavors of Android (or Linux in general, or brands of toothpaste) there should be instead of trying to decide the issue a priori.  They might even be pleasantly surprised to discover that a "fragmented" market works better than a consolidated one.

 
soozyg
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soozyg,
User Rank: Ninja
8/8/2015 | 2:07:54 PM
Re: Not even one benefit stated...
@glenn817 I believe one benefit stated is the diversity--people have more choices with Android and if there is a system issues, it doesn't effect every user.
soozyg
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soozyg,
User Rank: Ninja
8/8/2015 | 2:01:20 PM
standard
We should not expect our phones, or the code that runs them, to conform to a single standard.

Well, we might expect it, but the public is always talking about how they would prefer it. 
glenn817
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glenn817,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/8/2015 | 9:26:14 AM
Not even one benefit stated...
This article didn't make one point supporting the "diversity" of the Android ecosystem (except the dubious claim of greater security through diversity). Android may be a great OS, but this particular "diversity" is not a plus for the OS, developers, security, or its users.
funkyman53
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funkyman53,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/7/2015 | 9:33:55 AM
What???
This article isn't about fragmentation at all. This was about how there are a ton of different kinds of android phones and how that might be good for the OS vs how apple does things

 

Let's get this straigt: Fragmentation is not a good thing. This article has a very misleading title


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